Transportation

Policies tracked in the transporation area reflect the potential energy savings of closer integration of private transportation with buildings and electricity grids. 

Zero-Emission Vehicles Mandate

A zero-emission vehicle mandate sets a gradually increasing target for electric, plug-in hybrid and hydrogen vehicles to comprise a certain share of vehicles offered for sale. 

Alberta

There is no ZEV mandate in Alberta.

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

British Columbia originally announced its intention to pass a ZEV mandate by 2020 in its Fall 2018 CleanBC climate strategy.

The Zero-Emission Vehicles Act, passed in May 2019, implements a credit/debit system for auto manufacturers, requiring them to meet an escalating annual percentage of new light-duty ZEV sales and leases. The targets were 10% by 2025, 30% by 2030, and 100% by 2040.

In July 2020 the province introduced regulations for the Act, which included phased targets to be met each year, as well as compliance requirements.

In October 2021, the province released its CleanBC Roadmap to 2030 plan, which raises targets to 26% by 2026, 90%% by 2030, and 100% by 2035. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

There is no ZEV mandate in Manitoba.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

New Brunswick does not have a zero-emissions vehicle mandate.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Nova Scotia.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Northwest Territories.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Nunavut.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

There is no ZEV mandate in Ontario.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Prince Edward Island.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Québec introduced its Zero-Emission Vehicle Standard in October 2016 and it entered into force in January 2018. The standard established a credit/debit system that requires manufacturers to earn ZEV credits equivalent to 3.5% of light-duty vehicle sales and leases by 2018 and 22% by 2025.

In November 2020, the province announced that it would ban the sale of new gasoline-powered vehicles after 2035. The ZEV Standard will soon be tightened to allow Quebéc to reach its targets.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

No information available.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Electric Vehicle Charging Program

Policy or programs to support the installation of private residential or business charging stations facilitate vehicle adoption, and support for  publicly accessible charging stations for electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles can reduce ‘range anxiety’ barriers to adoption.

Alberta

In 2017, ATCO deployed a Calgary-Edmonton Universal Fast Charging Corridor, installed three charging stations in Edmonton, Red Deer and Calgary. Each location was installed with fast charging and Level 2 charging stations. This project was supported by Natural Resources Canada.

The Peaks to Prairies is an electric vehicle charging network in Southern Alberta comprising 20 charging stations, which was completed in 2020.

The City of Edmonton is working with ATCO to pilot curbside electric vehicle charging, with stations planned to be operational in 2020.

The MCCAC is also planning to launch a program to support public charging in 2021.

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

As part of the larger CleanBC Go Electric Program, the Province administers two separate programs for private and public charging station deployment. In September 2020, the Province launched the CleanBC Go Electric Public Charger program. Applicants can receive up to 50% of the cost of equipment and installation to a maximum of $80,000 per fast-charging station. Increased rebates of up to 90% of projects costs to a maximum of $130,000 per station are also available for Indigenous-owned fast-charging stations. At the end of 2020, there were 205 public DC fast charging sites representing 480 DC fast charging stations in BC. In addition there are over 2,100 recorded public Level 2 charging sites (with multiple stations per site). (The NRCan database is not up-to-date.)

BC has also partnered with the federal government such that successful applicants to the Natural Resources Canada ZEVIP program automatically receive the Go Electric Public Charger Rebate for stations in B.C.

The CleanBC EV Charger Rebate Program provides rebates for homes, MURBS and workplaces to install Level 2 charging stations. Homeowners can get up to $350 in rebates to install a Level 2 charging sation in a single-family home. Up to $2,000 is avaliable for the installation of a Level 2 charging station at a MURB or workplace. EV Ready rebates became avaliable in December 2020 which provide rebates for apartment and condo buildings to complete an EV ready plan, install electrical infrastructure to implement the EV Ready plan and install charging stations. Up to $97,000 in rebates per apartment or condo is available.

From January to December 2020, under the Private Charger Rebate program, 2,468 home EV charging stations were installed, 377 MURB EV charging stations were installed and 301 workplace EV charging stations were installed.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

Manitoba Hydro has a home energy efficiency loan for the installation of residential-use Level 2 chargers, with $3000 as the maximum loan amount.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

The e-Charge Network launched in 2017 by NB Power provides public networked level 2 and DC Fast Charging throughout the province. 

In 2019 and 2020 NB Power partnered with NRCan to launch an Electric Vehicle Education and Awareness Campaigns. The 2019 campaign delivered the message you can travel the entire province in an electric vehicle without range anxiety. The 2020 campaign educated New Brunswickers on the total life cycle cost of electric vehicles including the maintenance and fuel savings. The utility is currently working with Plug'n Drive to build on the EV public education and awareness campaigns. 

NB Power is working with one of our customers in the long haul trucking industry to pilot a 175kW charging station at their distribution depot. The usage data from this charging station will be shared with NB Power to inform and understand the impact of logistics adoption of EVs on the NB Power’s distribution system.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

In Budget 2019, the Province announced that, through an investment of $2 million, the Department of Municipal Affairs and Environment, in collaboration with Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro, will pursue funding opportunities with the Federal Government to enhance the electric vehicle charging station network.  

In 2020-21, the province completed a network of 14 new fast charging stations, running from St. John's to Port aux Basques.

The utilities’ 2021-2025 conservation plan includes an electrification component, which proposes residential and commercial vehicle and charging port incentive programs (Level 2 chargers).

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

NS Power installed a cross-province network of 12 DC fast charging stations on 100-series highways. There are no current incentives or programs to incentivize either public or private charging, though NS Power is piloting an initiative called Smart Grid Nova Scotia, which encourages customers to install a home EV charger and to give the utility the ability to control charging cycles. The goal is to shift EV charging demand to off-peak times.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

The AEA’s Electric Vehicle Incentive program provides support for Level 2 charging station installations (up to $500).

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

No electric vehicle charging support program identified.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

The Ivy Charging Network, a partnership between Hydro One and the Ontario Power Generation, is currently constructing Ontario’s largest EV fast charger network with 160 chargers at 70+ locations.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

In March 2019, PEI received $300,000 to install 6 level-3 electric vehicle fast charging stations under the federal Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Deployment Initiative.

efficiencyPEI has applied to Natural Resources Canada for funding to implement an EV charging incentive program for level 2 chargers for businesses, institutions, and multi-unit residential buildings.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Hydro-Quebec launched the Electric Circuit in March 2012. Under the program, the utility coordinates an international call for tenders and testing to provide EV charging infrastructure and related services to partners such as municipalities, institutions, and businesses. Partners can choose standard or fast-charging stations. EV drivers can become members to charge from all stations in the network. The Québec government offers financial assistance, up to a maximum of $600 for home charging, and 50% rebates up to $5,000 are available for workplace or multi-unit residential charging. The Transportez Vert program also offers financial assistance for the installation of DC fast charging to promote the electrification of fleets.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

There is no electric vehicle charging support program in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Yukon began offering rebates for Level 2 chargers to homeowners, businesses, municipalities, and First Nations in 2020. Rebates cover 50% of costs up to $750 for residential units and up to $4,000 for multi-unit residential buildings, commercial or institutional units. The territory’s Our Clean Future strategy sets the following goals: 

  • Continue to install fast-charging stations across Yukon to make it possible to travel between all road-accessible Yukon communities by 2027 and work with neighboring governments and organizations to explore options to connect Yukon with BC, Northwest Territories and Alaska.
  • Require new residential buildings to be built with the electrical infrastructure to support Level 2 electric vehicle charging beginning on April 1, 2021 (The City of Whitehorse currently requires all new residential buildings in the greater Whitehorse area be built with the electrical infrastructure to support Level 2 electric vehicle charging.)
  • Draft legislation by 2024 that will enable private businesses and Yukon’s public utilities to sell electricity for the purpose of electric vehicle charging.

In 2019, the Government of Yukon installed the territory’s first electric vehicle fast-charging stations in Whitehorse and Carcross, with financial support from the Government of Canada and in partnership with the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Northern Vision Development, Yukonstruct, Yukon College Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and ATCO Electric Yukon. Additional fast-charging stations were built in Marsh Lake and Haines Junction in 2020, and the government has tendered proposals to construct six more fast charging stations in 2021. All chargers are currently free to users.

 

Last reviewed: November 2021

EV and PHEV Financial Incentives

Financial incentives such as rebates, tax credits or sales tax exempltions can help to reduce the upfront costs of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

Alberta

Consumer incentives

Alberta does not offer consumer incentives.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

The Municipal Climate Change Action Centre in provides funding to municipalities to purchase or lease electric vehicles for their fleets. Passenger vehicles can be funded up to $14,000 and can be combined with the federal incentive. Funding for medium to heavy-duty vehicles such as electric garbage trucks will cover 30% of costs, up to $300,000. A portion of lease costs can also be covered on a scale, depending on the length of the lease.

Municipalities can access funding for non-road electric vehicles such as ATVs/UTVs, ice resurfacers, street sweepers, and more. All vehicles must be new models.

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

Consumer incentives

British Columbia introduced programs to support zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) uptake beginning in 2011. The CleanBC Go Electric Passenger Vehicle rebate program has been in operation since November 2011, and offfers direct-to-consumer, point-of-purchase rebates. Consumers are eligible for $3,000 off of the purchase price of a battery electric, fuel-cell electric, or longer range plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. A $1,500 rebate is also avaliable for the purchase or lease of a shorter-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. In 2020 there were 15,451 new ZEVs registered in BC which represents 9.4% of all new light-duty vehicle registrations in BC. (Data source, IHS Markit for light-duty vehicles. Note the last Efficiency Canada report displayed incorrect data.)

The SCRAP-IT programs offers rebates when you scrap an old vehicle in BC. EV purchasers apply for the rebate via the Scrap-It website. Rebates are avaliable for up to $6,000 for a new EV or up to $3,000 for a used EV. Participants are also eligible for rebates towards electric bikes, transit passes, car share credits, or cash rebates.

The CleanBC Go Electric Speciality Use Vehicle Incentive (SUVI) program provides rebates direct-to-consumer for ZEV adoption in a variety of applications including motorcycles, low-speed vehicles, electric cargo bikes, utility vehicles and a variery of medium and heavy duty vehicles. After purchasing an eligible vehicle participants can apply for rebates under the program. Up to $100,000 in rebates can recieved - rebate amounts differ depending on vehicle type.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

The province launched its CleanBC Go Electric Fleets Program in early 2021; it is intended to support public and private owners of light-duty fleets transition to ZEVs. The program takes a multi-pronged approach to address various barriers to ZEV adoption in fleets via financial and technical support. The province offers rebates to B.C.-registered companies, Indigenous and local governments, and public sector organizations with light-duty fleet vehicles. B.C. Ministries and Crown Corporations are ineligible. Indigenous communities and businesses are eligible for increased rebates for some of the program offers.

In the medium/heavy-duty vehicle space, British Columbia also offers commercial fleet managers a Specialty Use Vehicle Incentive, which offers rebates on the purchase of eligible ZEVs that do not fit into the light-duty vehicle/passenger vehicle rebate program. Finally, the province also has the Go Electric Commercial Vehicle Pilot Program, which offers up to one-third funding for the costs of piloting medium/heavy-duty and off-road ZEVs and infrastructure in commercial fleets in B.C. (including marine ports, airports, trucking, tourism, forestry, etc.)

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

There are no EV/PHEV incentives in Manitoba.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

Consumer Incentives

The Government of New Brunswick announced new direct-to-consumer incentives in July 2021, wherein purchasers of used battery electric vehicles may get up to $2,500, while purchasers of used plug-in hybrid electric vehicles may receive up to $1,000.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

As of July 2021, New Brunswick’s EV rebate program applies to commercial LDV fleets that meet the same EV criteria as the iZEV program. Commercial entities can access 10 vehicle incentives per calendar year.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

Consumer Incentives

Newfoundland and Labrador’s 2021 budget committed $500,000 for an electric vehicle adoption accelerator program, which will encourage the purchase of electric vehicles through a $2,500 rebate to their residents. This rebate program launched in September 2021, retroactive for vehicles purchased after May 31, 2021.

In their new 2021-2025 conservation and demand management plan, both utilities in Newfoundland and Labrador have also proposed vehicle incentives for both residential and commercial vehicles. None are yet in place, however.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

The TakeCharge consumer EV incentives that launched September 1, 2021 (retroactive to May 1, 2021) are also available to businesses, non-profit organizations, and municipalities. The utilities’ proposed 2021-2025 Electrification, Conservation and Demand Management plan includes incentives for commercial and municipal electric vehicles and charging stations.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

Consumer Incentives

In February 2021, Nova Scotia announced new direct-to-consumer incentives of $3,000 for new EVs, $2,000 for used EVs and new PHEVs, and $1,000 for used PHEVs through its EVAssist program.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

Fleet operators are also eligible to receive incentives through Nova Scotia’s EVAssist program. Eligibility requirements follow the federal iZEV program—businesses are limited to 10 vehicles per year, and light, medium and heavy-duty vehicles are eligible, provided they are fully electric, or fully powered by hydrogen. The program is not available to local governments.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

The AEA launched the Electric Vehicle Incentive Program in June 2020, which provides rebates to reduce the cost of purchasing and using an electric vehicle. This program is only available in Yellowknife and Hay River, which are served by hydroelectricity. The program provided a total of five rebates, with a value of $26,000 with $5,100 average rebate value (four in Yellowknife and one in Hay River), in 2020.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

No financial incentives for EV/PHEV vehicles identified.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

The province does not offer any consumer or commercial EV incentives, however Plug N Drive does offer up to $2,000 for used EVs, when combined with the old vehicle scrappage incentive. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island began offering $5,000 to residents who purchase a new or used EV in April 2021. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Consumer Incentives

Incentives of up to $8,000 are available for the purchase of a new electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles with a retail price less than $60,000, a reduced amount from 2019, when the retail price was required to be less than $75,000. For plug-in hybrids the incentive is calculated according to the electric battery capacity. Incentives are also available for low-speed electric vehicles and electric motorcycles. The rebate of up to $4,000 for purchase of used electric vehicle that was offered as a pilot is now an official part of the Roulez Vert program.

Commercial / Fleet electrification Incentives

Quebec’s Transportez Vert program provides $10,000 for commercial electric vans and trucks, and up to $100,000 for electric buses. The province will integrate the program into the Ministry of Transport’s Ecocamionnage program, which also provides vehicle incentives and support for other aspects of commercial freight emissions reduction, including incentives for used vehicles.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

There are no EV/PHEV financial incentives in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Yukon provides vehicle incentives through its Good Energy Clean Transportation program. The program provides incentives for both new (up to $5,000) and used (up to $1,500) hydrogen, electric, and plug-in electric vehicles, as well as zero-emission snowmobiles, e-bikes, and e-cargo bikes.

Last reviewed: November 2021

“EV Ready” Buildings

Governments can reduce barriers to EV/PHEVs by implementing requirements that new developments or major renovations include EV charging infrastructure, such as energized electrical outlets capable of Level 2 charging or higher.

Alberta

The City of Calgary has included BEV/PHEVs in its bylaws, but the province did not explicitly state that all municipalities had this power, or if any others had acted this way.

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

British Columbia is the only province that has explicitly defined EV chargers as “out of scope” for its Provincial Building Code Act. Out of scope is defined as “matters…local government can regulate…if they have authority to do so in other statutes.” This is important, and a valuable decision for other provinces to follow, as it gives municipalities the clear permission to implement EV charging in their bylaws.

The City of Vancouver has its own building code but has also chosen to adopt EV charging requirements in its parking bylaws. The bylaw requires residential and commercial parking spaces to be equipped with a set number of EV ready parking spaces, in addition to requirements for new dwellings with garages, that must be equipped with EV charging capability. The bylaw offers developers two tiers to base their installation around, with varying levels of power required, under the assumption that drivers will charge their vehicles around the city.

BC Hydro provided coaching for the implementation of EV-ready bylaws and supported the development of an updated best practice guide on EV-ready requirements for both residential and non-residential new buildings. It is also piloting the concept of E-Mobility Managers. These full-time staff will be responsible for advancing transportation electrification within local governments using available levers such as community plans, land use plans, policy and bylaws, zoning, permitting, and building code compliance

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

There are no building code provisions regarding EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

There are no provisions in building codes to support EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

There are no provisions in building codes to support EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

In the 2021 Premier mandate letters, the premier directed the Department of Energy and Mines to work with the Ministers of Infrastructure and Housing and Municipal Affairs to invest in electric vehicle charging infrastructure on provincial and municipal government buildings, and work toward electric vehicle fast chargers in all new commercial developments. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

No information available.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

No provisions in building codes for EV/PHEV charging instructure identified.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

In 2017 Ontario revised its building code to include provisions for EV charging (section 3.1.21) in Part 3 and Part 9 buildings. The provisions went into force on January 1, 2018 but were subsequently revoked by an amending regulation passed on May 2, 2019.

Local governments have the power to include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws, but none have yet done so.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

The PEI 2016-2017 Energy Strategy states that the government will consider “mandating that new homes be pre-wired for electric charging and link this measure to the adoption of the National Building Code.” It also examines the feasibility of requiring or encouraging outdoor parking in new multi-unit residential developments to be equipped with EV chargers.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Québec changed its electricity code in 2018 to include an obligation to install basic wiring for EV charging in single dwellings with garages, carports, or parking areas.

Municipalities have the power to include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws, and two municipalities have done so for high-rise residential buildings—the City of Sainte-Rose and the City of Laval.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

Municipalities can include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws but none have done so. There are no EV Ready provisions in Saskatchewan building codes.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

No information available.

Last reviewed: November 2021

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