Transportation

Policies tracked in the transporation area reflect the potential energy savings of closer integration of private transportation with buildings and electricity grids. 

Zero-Emission Vehicles Mandate

A zero-emission vehicle mandate sets a gradually increasing target for electric, plug-in hybrid and hydrogen vehicles to comprise a certain share of vehicles offered for sale. 

Alberta

There is no ZEV mandate in Alberta.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

There is a mandate for 100% of new cars to be ZEV by 2040, 30% ZEV by 2030 and 10% by 2025.

Budget 2019 dedicated $3 M to implementation of the ZEV standard. Regulations were introduced to enforce the ZEV mandate in July 2020, which introduced phased targets that will need to be met each year, as well as compliance requirements.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

There is no ZEV mandate in Manitoba.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

New Brunswick does not have a zero-emissions vehicle mandate.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Nova Scotia.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Northwest Territories.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Nunavut.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

There is no ZEV mandate in Ontario.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Prince Edward Island.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Quebec Zero-Emission Vehicle Standard was adopted under the Act to increase the number of zero-emission motor vehicles in Québec in order to reduce greenhouse gas and other pollutant emissions on October 26, 2016, and implemented via regulations A-33.02, r.1 and A-33.02 r. 2. The standard came into force on January 11, 2018. The ZEV mandate requires that manufacturers earn ZEV credits equal to 3.5% of light-duty vehicle sales and leases by 2018 and 22% by 2025. Vehicles that are reconditioned by automakers and registered in Québec are eligible for credits.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

There is no zero-emission vehicle mandate in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

No information available.

Last reviewed: September 2021

Electric Vehicle Charging Program

Policy or programs to support the installation of private residential or business charging stations facilitate vehicle adoption, and support for  publicly accessible charging stations for electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles can reduce ‘range anxiety’ barriers to adoption.

Alberta

EV Charging Program: Yes
Support for fast charging: Yes

In 2017, ATCO deployed a Calgary-Edmonton Universal Fast Charging Corridor, installed three charging stations in Edmonton, Red Deer and Calgary. Each location was installed with fast charging and Level 2 charging stations. This project was supported by Natural Resources Canada.

The Peaks to Prairies is an electric vehicle charging network in Southern Alberta with 12 charging stations installed at the end of January 2020, with all 20 expected by Spring 2020. The provincial government committed funding to this initiative in February 2019. Stations must be powered by renewable energy, through on-site generation and/or renewable energy certificates.

The City of Edmonton is working with ATCO to pilot curbside electric vehicle charging, with stations planned to be operational in 2020.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

As part of its larger Clean Energy Vehicles for BC program (CEV for BC), the province administers two separate support initiatives for private and public charging station deployment: a Go Electric Program (formerly called the  Charging Solutions and Incentives Program) for residential and Level 2 public charging stations, and a Fast DC Charger Program, in partnership with NRCAN, BC Hydro, local governments and academic institutions. As of March 2020, the programs combined have supported the construction of 1,300 residential and public charging stations, including over 80 DCFC stations.  For fiscal 2021, 16 new BC Hydro dual DCFC stations are being built, and 15 single DCFC stations are being upgraded to dual DCFC stations.

Budget 2020 dedicated $2 M to support new public fast-charging and hydrogen fueling stations, $5 M for home/workplace charging, and an additional $5 million is provided to continue incentives for zero-emission buses and heavy-duty vehicles, including trucks, port and airport ground equipment, and marine vessels.

In addition to provincial activities, FortisBC installed about 20 EV Charging stations in “underserved” communities in 2019.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

Manitoba Hydro introduced a funding program for the installation of residential-use Level 2 chargers, with $3000 as the maximum rebate amount.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

EV Charging Program: Yes
Support for Fast Chargers: Yes 

The eCharge Network includes level-2 charging station throughout the province and fast-charging stations along the TransCanada Highway.

In May 2018, the province announced an initiative to expand charging stations in provincial parks. In March 2019, the province announced the the addition of available fast e-charging sites throughout the province, as well as the development and delivery of an awareness and educational campaign.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

Proponents (e.g., municipalities, non-profit) are eligible to apply to the Province for the installation of EV infrastructure (Level 2 and 3) under the Green Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program.

Moreover, in Budget 2019 the Province announced that, through an investment of $2 million, the Department of Municipal Affairs and Environment, in collaboration with Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro, will pursue funding opportunities with the Federal Government to enhance the electric vehicle charging station network. The network of charging infrastructure is being installed in 2020.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

The Province does not have an active EV public charging program to deploy infrastructure. However, it has provided funding on a case-by-case basis.

NS Power installed a cross-province network of L3 fast charging stations available for public use on the 100-series highways. This network covers the majority of the province with stations every ~65km.

The province provided funding for L2 stations to accompany all 12 L3 stations.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

The 2030 Energy Strategy lists plans to “initiate a rebate program for low or zero emissions vehicle and charging stations in hydro communities” and to “assess the feasibility and complete Zero-Emissions Vehicle Transport Corridor NWT Border to Yellowknife”.

In 2015, the Arctic Energy Alliance tested a Chevrolet Volt.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

No electric vehicle charging support program identified.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

While most charging programs were cancelled with the 2018 cancellation of the cap and trade program, Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One have partnered to install 160 fast chargers across Ontario, called the Ivy Network, throughout 2020.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

In March 2019, PEI received $300,000 to install 6 level-3 electric vehicle fast charging stations under the federal Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Deployment Initiative. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

The Electric Circuit launched in March 2012. Under the program Hydro-Quebec coordinates an international call for tenders and testing to provide EV charging infrastructure and related services to partners such as municipalities, institutions, and businesses to install charging infrastructure. Partners can choose standard or fast-charging stations. EV drivers can become members to charge from all stations in the network. 

The Québec government offers a financial assistance, up to a maximum of $600, for home station charging; 50% rebates up to $5,000 are available for workplace or multi-unit residential charging. The Transportez Vert program also offers financial assistance for the installation of DC fast charging to promote the electrification of fleets.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

There is no electric vehicle charging support program in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

The Yukon government installed three new level 3 DC fast charging stations in Whitehorse and Carcross towards the end of 2019, the first in the territory, with the support of NRCan’s Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Demonstration program. This is in addition to the existing three level 2 charging stations in the territory. Members of the public are able to charge their electric vehicles at all six stations for free, and two more are being added in other communities in 2020.

Last reviewed: August 2020

EV and PHEV Financial Incentives

Financial incentives such as rebates, tax credits or sales tax exempltions can help to reduce the upfront costs of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

Alberta

Alberta does not offer consumer incentives, but The Municipal Climate Change Action Centre in provides funding to municipalities to purchase or lease electric vehicles for their fleets. Passenger vehicles can be funded up to $14,000 and can be combined with the federal incentive. Funding for medium to heavy-duty vehicles such as electric garbage trucks will cover 30% of costs, up to $300,000. A portion of lease costs can also be covered on a scale, depending on the length of the lease.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

The Clean Energy Vehicles for British Columbia (CEV for BC) Program has offered point of sale incentives since November 2011. Consumers are eligible for $3,000 off the price of a battery electric, fuel-cell electric, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, a reduced incentive from 2019, when it was $5,000. The program recognizes significant sales by car dealerships through the “Green Star Awards”.  In its 2020 Budget, the provincial government allocated $20m to support the continuation of the Go Electric Program, light-duty fleet adoption of ZEVs, and incentives for medium and heavy-duty vehicles.

The SCRAP-IT programs provides up to $6,000 incentive for a new electric car or up to $3,000 for a used electric car, when trading in an old gas car. Participants are also eligible for electric bikes, cash, mobility scooters, transit passes, and car share credits.

The Speciality Use Vehicle Incentive program offers $2,000-$5,000 for vehicles such as electric motorcycles, forklifts and low-speed vehicles.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

There are no EV/PHEV financial incentives in Manitoba.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

Drive Electric NB offered a $1000 rebate towards the purchase of a new or used electric vehicle, or plug-in hybrid vehicle when you traded in your gas-powered car. The program ran from April 2018 – March 31, 2019. Ten rebates of $1000 were offered again between September 2019 – February 2020. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

There are no financial incentives for EV/PHEVs in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia does not have a public direct consumer incentive program, but has a funding program, Connect 2, for sustainable transportation, which has been operating since 2012. One of the funding options with Connect 2 provides funding for introducing zero-emission fleet projects, with grants up to $75,000. Several fleet projects were funded between 2019-2020, and applications for this year must be received by September 30, 2020, with projects completed by September 2021.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

No information available.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

No financial incentives for EV/PHEV vehicles identified.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

Ontario does not offer any consumer or fleet EV and PHEV financial incentives.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

There are no financial incentives for EV/PHEVs in Prince Edward Island.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Incentives of up to $8,000 are available for the purchase of a new electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles with a retail price less than $60,000, a reduced amount from 2019, when the retail price was required to be less than $75,000. For plug-in hybrids the incentive is calculated according to the electric battery capacity. Incentives are also available for low-speed electric vehicles and electric motorcycles.

The rebate of up to $4,000 for purchase of used electric vehicle that was offered as a pilot is now an official part of the Roulez Vert program. New in May 2020, the Transportez Vert program offers up to $10,000 for commercial electric vans and trucks, and since February 2020, has also offered up to $100,000 for electric buses.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

There are no EV/PHEV financial incentives in Saskatchewan.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

No information available.

Last reviewed: August 2020

“EV Ready” Buildings

Governments can reduce barriers to EV/PHEVs by implementing requirements that new developments or major renovations include EV charging infrastructure, such as energized electrical outlets capable of Level 2 charging or higher.

Alberta

Municipalities may have the power to include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws as the City of Calgary has done so, but it is unclear if this is possible for all municipalities, or if any others have done so.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

British Columbia clarified in 2016 that EV charging infrastructure was a matter ‘out of scope’ of the provincial Building Act. ‘Out of scope’ is defined as “matters… local government can regulate… if they have authority to do so in other statutes.” This clarification thus gives local governments greater flexibility and confidence in making decisions regarding the use of EV charging in new developments.

A number of municipal governments in BC have revised by-laws to require EV charging in new builds and requirements for EV-ready stalls in multi-unit buildings. For details by municipality, see https://pluginbc.ca/policy/

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

There are no building code provisions regarding EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

There are no provisions in building codes to support EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

There are no provisions in building codes to support EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

There are no provisions in building codes for EV/PHEV charging infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

No information available.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

No provisions in building codes for EV/PHEV charging instructure identified.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

The Ontario Building Code was revised in 2017 to include provisions for EV charging (section 3.1.21) in Part 3 and Part 9 buildings. The provisions went into force on January 1, 2018, but were subsequently revoked by an amending regulation passed on May 2, 2019. Municipalities have the power to include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws but none have done so.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

The PEI 2016-2017 Energy Strategy states that the government will consider “mandating that new homes be pre-wired for electric charging and link this measure to the adoption of the National Building Code. We will also examine the feasibility of requiring or encouraging outdoor parking in new multi-unit residential developments to be equipped with EV chargers.”

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Québec changed its electricity code in 2018 to include an obligation to install basic wiring for EV charging in single dwellings with garages, carports, or parking areas.

Municipalities have the power to include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws, and two municipalities have done so for high-rise residential buildings – the City of Sainte-Rose and the City of Laval.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Municipalities can include EV/PHEVs in their bylaws but none have done so. There are no EV Ready provisions in Saskatchewan building codes. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

No information available.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Download the Scorecard

Download the Scorecard

 (Available in French and English)

You have Successfully Subscribed!