Building Codes

Building codes set minimum standards for the design and construction of new buildings, including energy efficiency requirements. Responsibility for adopting new building codes rests with the provinces and territories, which can further delegate that responsibility to municipalities.

Alberta

Houses and Small Buildings
The National Building Code – 2019 Alberta Edition is based on the 2015 edition of the National Building Code (including section 9.36 on energy performance). The previous version of this code was based on the 2010 National Building Code, and the 2012 revision to section 9.36 on energy performance

Large Buildings
The National Energy Code for Building – 2017 Edition was adopted for new buildings other than housing and small buildings by provincial regulation in February 2019, and will come into force on April 1, 2019. The previous version of the code were based on the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings.

Stretch or Step Codes
Alberta does not have a stretch or step code.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
There is no formal commitment to move towards net-zero energy buildings in Alberta.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

Building Code – Housing and Small Buildings
The Building Act was passed in the spring of 2015, which sets the provincial building code as the minimum standard in all municipalities except in the City of Vancouver, federal lands and reserves.

The 2018 edition of the BC Building Code references the 2015 version of the National Building Code, which includes energy performance requirements for housing and small buildings. This code was adopted in July 2018 and entered into force in December 2018.

Building Code – Large Buildings
The Building Act was passed in the spring of 2015, which sets the provincial building code as the minimum standard in all municipalities except in the City of Vancouver, federal lands and reserves.

The 2018 edition of the BC Building Code references the National Energy Code for Buildings 2015, and the ANSI/ASHRAE 90.1-2016 “Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings”. This code was adopted in July 2018 and entered into force in December 2018.

A relaxation to ASHRAE 90.1 was incorporated in the BCBC 2018, for Subsection 8.4.2. of ASHRAE 90.1-2016. The requirement to comply with Subsection 8.4.2. of the ASHRAE 90.1 standard, regarding automatic receptacle control for 50% of receptacles in most spaces, and 25% branch feeders for modular furniture that are not part of the construction documents. Clause 10.2.2.1.(1)(a) is amended to reduce compliance costs for buildings, where compliance may be costly and defeated very easily (e.g. using power bars plugged into uncontrolled outlets).

Stretch or Step Codes
The BC Building Code was amended in April 2017 to include the BC Energy Step Code, which presents progressive targets for energy efficiency performance in new buildings. Municipalities can write by-laws or implement policies and programs that require new buildings in one of their municipalities to be constructed to one of the steps in the BC Energy Step Code. There are four steps for large buildings, and five steps for houses and small buildings. Every step is evaluated using the same tests and metrics.

The BC Energy Step Code was revised in December 2018 to:

  • Facilitate BC Energy Step Code compliance for smaller buildings and in colder climates;
  • Address issues where large single-family dwellings could comply with Steps 2 or 3 without an improvement over the base BCBC;
  • Remove Peak Thermal Load as a compliance path for the BC Energy Step Code;
  • Facilitate compliance with the BC Energy Step Code where cooling is intended for the building;
  • Enable airtightness compliance with the BC Energy Step Code through the EnerGuide Rating System;
  • Enable the BC Energy Step Code as a compliance path for Part 3 buildings outside of Climate Zone 4;
  • Create new BC Energy Step Code targets for Hotels and Motels, and for Offices;
  • Revise air leakage rates for Part 3 buildings complying with the BC Energy Step Code at the design stage in energy models;
  • Clarification on the use of the City of Vancouver Energy Modelling Guidelines (CoV EMG) where it conflicts with the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) for compliance with the BC Energy Step Code;
  • A new requirement to report on the floor area of conditioned space for BC Energy Step Code buildings on house performance compliance calculation reports; and
  • A clarification for Part 3 buildings that BC Energy Step Code recording requirements apply both at the pre-construction and pre-occupancy stage.

Building Code changes taking effect Dec 12, 2019 include

  • Removal of restrictions on the size and construction of secondary suites, which could promote densification and housing affordability
  • Allowance of 12-storey wood buildings, an increase from the previous 6 storey limit, which enables the use of sustainable building materials

Net-zero energy ready commitment
BC has committed to mandate a net-zero energy ready standard for new buildings by 2032. The final steps in the BC Energy Step Code meet the net-zero energy ready standard.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

Housing and Small Buildings
The Manitoba Building Code is adopted as regulation 31/2011 under the Buildings and Mobile Homes Act. Section 9.36 applies of the Manitoba Code applies to houses and smaller buildings and follows the 2012 National Building Code’s provisions for energy efficiency. The energy efficiency provisions came into force on April 1, 2016.

Large Buildings
The Manitoba Energy Code for Buildings (MECB) was created through regulation 213/2013 under the Buildings and Mobile Homes Act. It applies to “larger buildings” (greater than 600 square meters of floor area). The MECB follows the 2011 National Energy Code of Canada. This code became effective on December 1, 2014.

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step codes have been adopted in Manitoba.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No formal commitment to adopt net-zero energy ready building codes.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

Building Codes

Legislation introduced in March 2020 gives cabinet the authority to adopt the latest versions of the National Building Code and the National Energy Code for Buildings. The government’s goal is to have the new building code in place across New Brunswick in time for the start of the 2021 construction season

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step code. 

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No formal commitment to a net-zero energy ready standard.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

Housing and Small Buildings
The Province’s Municipalities Act requires municipal councils to adopt “the National Building Code of Canada and supplements or amendments to that Code” (Section 414 (3)). This would include the 2015 NBC revisions.  There is no provincial building code.

Large Buildings
There is no provincial building code in the Province, though the Municipalities Act requires municipal councils to adopt the National Building Code and subsequent amendments to the code when making regulations pertaining to buildings.

Stretch or Step Codes
The Municipalities Act (Sect 414 (3)) allows municipal councils to adopt standards that exceed the requirements of the National Building Code of Canada, plus supplements and amendments. The province has not provided performance criteria, or a formal program, for a stretch or step code.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to net-zero energy ready codes.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

Housing and Small Buildings
Nova Scotia Regulation 26/2017 to the Building Code Act made on March 1, 2017 adopted the 2015 National Building Code, effective April 1, 2017. This includes section 9.36 regulating energy efficiency in housing and small buildings. 

Large Buildings
In January 2020, Nova Scotia amended to N.S. Reg. 179/2019 (effective January 1, 2020) to adopt the 2017 National Energy Code for Buildings.

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step codes.  

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to a net-zero energy ready provision in Nova Scotia.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

Housing and Small Buildings
Amendment R-103-2016 was made on August 15th, 2016 to the Fire Prevention Act adopting 2015 National Building Code, and coming into force on November 15, 2016. This includes section 9.36 concerning energy efficiency in houses and small buildings.

The City of Yellowknife had adopted an Energuide 80 standard, yet removed this in June 2018 after the federal government changed the Energuide rating system. In September 2019, a new by-law adopts standards 25% higher than the 2015 National Building Code.[1]

Large Buildings
The Northwest Territories has not adopted a National Energy Code for Buildings or implemented specific criteria for energy efficiency in large buildings.

The City of Yellowknife adopted the 2017 National Energy Code for Buildings in September 2019.[2]

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch of step codes.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No net-zero energy ready committment.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Nunavut

Housing and Small Buildings
Nunavut adopted the 2015 National Building Code through regulation R-009-2018 made under the Building Code Act. The code was adopted on March 29, 2018 and in force September 1, 2018. This includes section 9.36 related to energy efficiency in homes and small buildings.

Large Buildings
The territory has not adopted a version of the National Energy Code for Buildings or implemented specific energy efficiency provisions for large buildings.

Note that there might be very few multi-story buildings in the territory.

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step code.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to net-zero energy ready codes.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Ontario

Housing and Small Buildings
The last energy efficiency related update to the Ontario Building Code (regulation under the Building Code Act) related to energy efficiency in housing, known as Supplementary Standard SB-12, came into force on July 7, 2016.

Ontario’s code for low-rise housing is stated to achieve a 15% improvements over previous versions of the code that required a level of efficiency equivalent to an 80 on the EnerGuide scale. The code also allows compliance based on Energy Star v12.1 and R2000 (2012) standards.

To compare against model national codes, the National Research Council of Canada states that the 2012 amendments to the National Building Code is consistent with an Energuide rating “slightly better than 78”, on average.

Large Buildings
The last energy efficiency related update to the Ontario Building Code (regulation under the Building Code Act), known as Supplementary Standard SB-10, related to non-residential buildings was made on December 22, 2016 and came into force on January 1, 2017. Compliance paths under the code are based on ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013, the 2015 National Energy Code for Buildings, and ASHRAE Standard 189.1-2014 related to “green buildings”.

These requirements are stated to achieve, on average, a 13% improvement over the previous code which is stated to be roughly equivalent to Canada’s National Energy Code for Buildings 2011.

To compare against model national codes, software modeling of the National Energy Code for Buildings 2017 standard indicates energy efficiency improvements 10.3% to 14.4% over the NECB 2011.

Stretch or Step Codes
No commitment to a stretch or step code.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No formal commitment to net-zero energy ready standard.

Ontario’s Five Year Climate Change Action Plan 2016-2020 stated that the government intended to update the building code with “long-term energy efficiency targets for new net zero carbon emission small buildings that will come into effect by 2030 at the latest." However, this commitment has not been renewed by the new government’s Environment Plan.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

The Building Code Act received Royal Assent in May 2017. This Act enables the government to make regulations that enforce adopt and enforce a specific edition of the National Building Code and National Energy Code of Canada (section 32(a)(a).

Housing and Small Buildings
The province has adopted and implemented the 2015 version of the National Building Code.

Large Buildings
The province has adopted and implemented the 2015 version of the National Energy Code for Buildings. 

Stretch or Step Codes
No formal adoption of a stretch or step code.

The PEI Energy Strategy 2016/2017 discusses establishing a stretch code that would track the 5-year updates to national building codes.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to net-zero energy ready codes.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Housing and Small Buildings
The last update to energy efficiency in the Quebec Construction code for small residential buildings was in 2012, by adding part 11 to Chapter 1. These energy efficiency requirements are not the same as section 9.36 on energy efficiency in the model national building code. The regulatory provisions are largely inspired by the first version of the Novoclimat program in Quebec.

The transition énergétique Quebec 2018-2023 Master Plan plans to boost the energy efficiency requirements for residential buildings. By 2021-22, the plan aims to improve the existing 2012 regulations governing small and multi-unit residential buildings.

Large Buildings
Quebec has adopted and implemented the 2015 National Energy Code for Buildings as of June 27, 2020. The regulations make some adjustments to the model code, exceeding it in some areas (heat recovery in pools, grocery stores, and arenas), falling short of it in others (minimum thermal resistance of walls and roofs). 

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step code has been published or adopted.

The transition énergétique Quebec 2018-2023 Master Plan states that Québec will publish a “voluntary standard” called The Québec Energy Code for Buildings in 2021/22 that will exceed the minimum energy code. This voluntary code will then be adopted for residential and commercial/institutional buildings in 2023/28.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
The TEQ Master Plan notes that any adoption of a net zero energy ready building code in Québec will consider the province’s context as a “green electricity” consumer.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Housing and Small Buildings
Regulation 128/2017 to the Uniform Building and Accessibility Standards Act adopted section 9.36 of the 2015 National Building Code of Canada, relating to energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. These standards came into force on January 1, 2019.

Large Buildings
 Regulation 93/2018 to the Uniform Building and Accessibility Standards Act adopted the 2017 National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings, coming into force on January 1, 2019.

Stretch or Step Codes
No stretch or step codes.

The Uniform Building and Accessibility Standards Regulation states that future editions of the National Building Code of Canada will be adopted one year after being issued (Part II, Section 4(a))

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to net-zero energy ready codes.

A “What we Heard” consultation document from April 23, 2018 on the government’s climate strategy noted tracking the number and percentage of net-zero ready buildings in the province.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

Housing and Small Buildings
Yukon adopted the 2015 National Building Code, including energy efficiency provisions related to section 9.36 with some modification, through a regulation to the Building Standards Act made on April 1, 2016. The 2015 National Building Code came into force on April 1, 2017.

The City of Whitehorse regulates new construction under its Building and Plumbing Bylaw. Requirements under this bylaw include thermal insulation values of R28 walls, R60 attics, and a maximum of 1.5 air changes per house (@ 50 Pa), heat recovery ventilator systems shall be done by a certified Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada designer. The exceptions are residential accessory buildings and cold storage buildings.

Large Buildings
Yukon has not adopted any version of the National Energy Code for Buildings or other energy efficiency standards for large buildings.

The City of Whitehorse’s Building and Plumbing Bylaw (section 86(3)) requires all commercial construction to “adhere to the current edition of the National Building Code or the National Energy Code”. This means the 2017 National Energy Code for Building is enforced within Whitehorse.

Stretch or Step Codes
No formal adoption of a stretch or step code across the Territory. Yet the City of Whitehorse, where 3/4th of the territories population lives, has adopted a much more stringent building code under its Building and Plumbing Bylaw that applies to both large and small buildings. Requirements under this bylaw include thermal insulation values of R28 walls, R60 attics, and a maximum of 1.5 air changes per house (@ 50 Pa), heat recovery ventilator systems shall be done by a certified Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada designer. The exceptions are residential accessory buildings and cold storage buildings.

Net-zero energy ready commitment
No commitment to net-zero energy ready codes.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Building Code Compliance

Building energy codes only save energy if builders comply with them. Creating a robust policy framework for code compliance can also help build capacity for more stringent energy codes in the future.

Alberta

No compliance studies were identifed in Alberta.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

The province and BC Hydro conducted a compliance study in 2015. The study surveyed building officials and building professionals, and estimated a 60% compliance rate, and a 79% compliance rate amongst the buildings that the respondents were engaged with.

British Columbia was also able to provide evidence of dedicated resources for energy code compliance. The provincial government estimated that one full-time equivalent staff position was dedicated to energy code compliance. Utility involvement is also enabled through the requirement for utilities to spend a minimum of 1% of their budgets on codes and standards, through the Demand Side Measures Regulation. BC Hydro estimated that approximately $300,000 for codes and standards relates to compliance activities.

In addition, British Columbia has activity in all compliance categories. These activities were largely related to the policy framework and engagement around the Energy Step Code. Relevant activities include:

Training and Technical Assistance

  • Provincial energy coaches to support local government compliance efforts.
  • In-person and on-line courses through Energy Foundations Program with Building Officials of British Columbia
  • Energy Step Code Handbook for Building Officials

Utility Involvement

  • Technical support for Energy Step Code Council subcommittee
  • Utilities co-funding local government building officials with energy code compliance workplans
  • Support for training and educational materials for industry

Compliance Tools

  • Building Energy Requirements Tool enables easier compliance review for permitting by Areas Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)
  • Checklists for energy modellers and design professionals to verify compliance

Stakeholder Group or Collaborative

  • The BC Energy Step Code Council includes a “Compliance and Energy Advisor Subcommittee”

Gap Analysis

Competency framework and gap analysis developed through the Energy Foundations Program

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

A number of Manitoba Hydro technical and program staff participated in meetings led by the Office of the Fire Commissioner (OFC) with the larger Authority Having Jurisdictions (AHJs) to discuss the energy code adoption and consistent application of the code. This group met in the period around 2015 and 2016.  Manitoba Hydro staff also met with the City of Winnipeg and the OFC to provide technical assistance with the auditing of six projects in total. The in-kind support provided feedback on the information to be reviewed and information the AHJ should be asking industry to provide.

A number of Manitoba Hydro staff have also provided code specific presentations to local industry associations and postsecondary educational institutions.

Presentations, as well as code compliance checklists and other information are available from the Office of the Fire Commissioner's website.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

No compliance activities identified.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

There have been no code compliance studies conducted in the province, though the province has develoepd two publicly available training guides: Guide to Building Energy Efficient Homes and Small Buildings – 2016, and Guide to Better Building Envelopes for Large Buildings – 2016.

The 7 largest municipalities in the province (covering about 40% of the the province's population) have a working group to share information and build capacity on a range of municipal codes, regulations and related issue. Energy codes is an agenda item for the group.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

No code compliance studies have been completed in Nova Scotia.

The province of Nova Scotia has provided funding to Efficiency Nova Scotia to develop additional training for the energy efficiency requirements in new buildings. This training is offered at no or minimal cost, and during times that work best for the buildings community.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

No code compliance activities identified. 

Last reviewed: August 2019

Nunavut

No code compliance activities identified. 

Last reviewed: August 2019

Ontario

Little information on code compliance activities is available. The buildings codes have traditionally been designed through stakeholder collaboration, which helps facilitate awareness of codes amongst multiple actors. For instance, as part of this process there are meetings with the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (Building and Development Branch) with organizations that represent municipal building officials.

On September 24, 2019, the Ontario government launched a 60-day public consultation on its proposal to establish an administrative authority that would deliver building regulatory services.

As part of the consultation, the ministry sought preliminary feedback from key stakeholders and the public on a modern suite of building regulatory services, policy frameworks and tools to support compliance with and enforcement of building code requirements.

On March 12, 2020, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing introduced Bill 184, Protecting Tenants and Strengthening Community Housing Act, 2020, which included amendments to the Building Code Act, 1992, that would allow for the future creation of an administrative authority to deliver building regulatory services. Ministry work to move building services transformation forward is ongoing. Future consultations with stakeholders are anticipated and no decisions have been made at this time about what services would be delivered by a future administrative authority.

Compliance Tools

  • SB-10 Compliance checklists
  • Comcheck software/ ASHRAE based codes
  • Inclusion of the Ontario Reference House in the HOT2000 software
  • Energy Modelling guidelines

Stakeholder groups

The Ontario Home Builders Association and the Ontario Building Officials Association formed a technical working group to help with consistency of compliance.  Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing staff also participate. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

The province reported an estimate of two full-time equivalent staff positions dedicated to compliance and enforcement. EfficiencyPEI also partners with a local trade college to provide a building/energy code training course. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

L’organisme Garantie Résidentielle (GCR) conducts annual inspections of code compliance in a sample of residential construction projects, which could include energy efficiency requirements.

The Régie du bâtiment du Québec established an interpretation committee to deal with the residential sector’s energy efficiency requirements.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan developed a Guide to Implementation of NECB 2017 which includes tools such as a compliance checklist.  Training sessions were also conducted through the Saskatchewan Building Officials Association, the Building Standards and Licensing Branch of the Ministry of Government Relations, and the Canada Green Building Council, and SaskEnergy took part in a provincial committee on codes and code compliance.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

No code compliance activities identified.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Home Energy Rating and Disclosure

Energy ratings and disclosure make building energy performance visible and can help drive a market for efficiency upgrades and improved building operations.  This section covers rating and disclosure policy for residential structures. 

Alberta

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: Yes

Through the Change Homes for Climate initiative, launched in 2017, the City of Edmonton and Energy Efficiency Alberta provide $400 against the cost of an energy evaluation when results are shared online, plus additional incentives to support renovations, as part of the Home Energy Plan program. Edmonton City Council supported developing a new and existing home energy labeling program in the June 2012 Green Building Plan.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No (under consideration)
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: Yes

The Clean BC Climate Action Plan states that the province is exploring energy rating requirements “at the point of sale or lease”. The plan discusses stakeholder consultation and the goal of making energy rating requirements “as simple and inexpensive at possible”.

The City of Vancouver has mandatory home rating at time of construction and retrofit. Several municipalities who have adopted BC Step Code have mandatory rating for new homes.

Rateourhome.ca is a pilot project that allows residents of Metro Vancouver to voluntarily display EnerGuide ratings online on a home energy map. The campaign is funded by the Homeowner Protection Office and Metro Vancouver and by Natural Resources Canada through the Energy Star for New Homes Program.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

Manitoba Hydro provides an EnerGuide label for all energy efficient new homes built under the Performance Path of its New Homes Program.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

The 2016 Climate Action Plan, Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy, stated that the government would “if viable, require energy labeling for all new building construction, both residential and commercial”.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: Yes 

Home sellers can upload their EnerGuide label onto the Viewpoint real estate listing website. This project received funding from the Government of Canada and is a joint venture between Efficiency Nova Scotia, the province, Nova Scotia Association of Realtors, and Viewpoint.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

Last reviewed: August 2019

Nunavut

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

The 2007 Nunavut Energy Strategy calls for introducing Energy Star labels for New Buildings.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Ontario

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: Yes (experience with a pilot project)

Ontario previously enabled mandatory disclosure of energy information prior to the sale of a home under the Green Energy Act, 2009 by creating a right to receive the information, however, the provision was never proclaimed into force. The provision was not reintroduced with the repeal of the Green Energy Act, 2009 in 2018.

The 2012-2014 Enbridge Gas demand side management plan included a “Home labelling” market transformation program, marketed at “Know Your Energy Score”. The program was successful in meeting targets for realtor commitments, but not for actual home listings with energy ratings. The Ontario Energy Board’s decision regarding the 2015-2020 DSM plan did not approve continuation of a home rating program. The OEB recognized the merit of the program, and suggested it should also include electricity savings – recommending that gas utilities work with the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) and the Ministry of Energy to deliver a program.

The Ontario Environment Plan, released in November 2018, states an intention to “work with the Ontario Real Estate Association to encourage the voluntary display of home energy efficiency information on real estate listings to better inform buyers and encourage energy-efficiency measures.”

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

The 2017 PEI Energy Strategy lists an action item to “implement mandatory building labeling for the residential sector when homes are listed for sale”, and to “examine the feasibility of a mandatory commercial/institutional building energy reporting system, or a voluntary one led by government buildings”.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No 

The TEQ Master Plan includes a road map to eventually implement a compulsory energy efficiency rating system for new buildings and upon the resale of single-family homes. The roadmap calls for forming a working group on mandatory energy ratings in 2018/19, launching a pilot project in at least one city in 2021/22, and mandatory ratings by 2023/28.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: No
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No

The December 2017 Climate Change Strategy states that the government will “explore options to label buildings for energy performance”.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

Mandatory home energy rating and disclosure: Yes (new homes in Whitehorse)
Home energy labelling voluntary or pilot program: No 

The City of Whitehorse Building and Plumbing Bylaw requires an EnerGuide rating system label on all new homes, as of April 1, 2014.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Building Energy Rating and Disclosure

Energy ratings and disclosure make building energy performance visible and can help drive a market for efficiency upgrades and improved building operations.  This section covers rating and disclosure policy for commercial, institutional, and multi-unit residential buildings. 

Alberta

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: Yes

Alberta’s Municipal Climate Change Action Centre, which is funded by the Government of Alberta and Energy Efficiency Alberta, established a voluntary building-benchmarking program for municipal buildings.

The City of Edmonton has launched a Building Energy Benchmarking Program, for owners and operators of large buildings (both residential and commercial with over 20,000 square feet). Participants who opt-in receive technical support, customized building benchmarking reports, tenant education workshops and access to financial incentives (up to $10,000/building) to help offset the costs of an energy audit. The program uses ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager online services.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: Yes

BC Hydro has an energy benchmarking program for commercial and residential properties with at least 20 units, using the Energy Star Portfolio Manager Web Service.

BC Hydro operates Energy Management Assessment workshops in the province. Targeting large properties, these are diagnostic workshops for senior building managers and produce a detailed report on energy management opportunities for an organization. BC Hydro collaborates with energy managers to provide the resources needed to implement recommendations of the report and to develop implementation action plans. This program benchmarks facilities within the same industry and provides an annual review to track progress for the organization.

Some municipalities require mandatory energy and GHG reporting for new buildings.  For instance, the City of Vancouver and municipalities using the BC Energy Step Code require new buildings to upload basic building information and estimated energy and GHG emissions into Energy Star Portfolio Manager.

The Clean BC Climate Action Plan states that the province is exploring energy rating requirements “at the point of sale or lease”. The plan discusses stakeholder consultation and the goal of making energy rating requirements “as simple and inexpensive at possible”.  This includes requirements for larger buildings.

A BC-wide voluntary benchmarking and disclosure program was launched in 2019, and is managed by OPEN, with support from NRCan, BC Hydro, and local governments. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: Yes

Manitoba Hydro offers a free service to automatically upload energy consumption data to Energy Star Portfolio manager, for those who opt in.

EnerTrend is a subscription-based service through Manitoba Hydro that creates energy profiles for large industrial and commercial operations. This service creates a building profile and identifies cost-saving measures.

Manitoba Hydro offers free energy efficiency screening studies for commercial buildings. These studies identify energy efficiency opportunities, but also benchmark building consumption to industry averages to encourage savings.

In Manitoba’s 2013 Green Buildings Program, regular energy and water use tracking for government buildings is mandated. In order to help government buildings reach this goal, the Government of Manitoba recommends participation with NRCan’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager benchmarking tool.

In 2011, the Winnipeg City Council introduced measures mandating the energy and water performance benchmarking of city-owned buildings of over 3,000 m2. The City of Winnipeg also employs the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager Tool for benchmarking.

Manitoba Race to Reduce is a corporate challenge to reduce total energy use by 10% in participating commercial buildings

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

The 2016 Climate Action Plan, Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy, stated that the government would “require energy performance identification for all publicly funded new construction and major building renovations”.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: Yes

The province, along with ENS and CaGBC, announced a voluntary energy benchmarking program in September of 2018. This program was officially launched in April 2020. Funding from NRCan’s benchmarking program is supporting this program, along with funding from the province. This program will run for three years.

Efficiency Nova Scotia’s Onsite Energy Management program includes benchmarking participatory organization’s energy use against similar organizations.

The NS Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is using Energy Star Portfolio Manager to benchmark nearly 80 department owned buildings as part of the Energy Conservation Program. This benchmarking initiative is associated with a building recommissioning project.

Last reviewed: November 2020

Northwest Territories

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: Yes

Ontario requires annual reporting on water and energy use for commercial, industrial, and multi-residential buildings with more than 10 units and buildings that are 100,000 square ft or larger, with some exemptions. Data must be verified in the first year and every five years and reported through Energy Star Portfolio Manager. July 1, 2018 is the first reporting period for commercial and industrial buildings 250,000 and larger (not including residential buildings), and July 1, 2019 for buildings 100,000 square feet and larger (including multi-unit residential buildings).

July 1, 2020 was the original the deadline for reporting for buildings that are 50,000 square feet or larger (in the required categories). An amendment to O.Reg 506/18, posted on October 28, 2019, proposed to stop the further rollout of the program to buildings under 100,000 square feet (proposal number 19-ENDM010).  This proposal stalled, but the roll-out was nevertheless deferred until July 1, 2023.

The policy is enacted under Ontario Regulation 506/18 under the Electricity Act, 1998.1  It was originally instituted under Ontario Regulation 20/17 under the Green Energy Act, 2009 and was re-enacted after the Green Energy Repeal Act, 2018 passed.

Last reviewed: November 2020

Prince Edward Island

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: Yes

The Building Energy Challenge (Défi-Énergie en immobilier) is a program for commercial and institutional buildings to voluntarily disclose energy-use data to competitors. It is a 4-year competition, launched in May 2018. The program is coordinated by BOMA Québec and supported by the City of Montreal, Transition énergétique Québec, Énergir and Hydro-Québec. Reported data is not made public, but the next iteration of the program plans to require public disclosure.

The Transition énergétique Québec calls for making the disclosure of commercial and institutional building use data mandatory in the 2023/28 timeframe. It also foresees making government buildings energy data disclosure mandatory by 2023.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

The City of Regina participates in the Municipal Benchmarking Network of Canada, which collects data on the energy use of municipal headquarter buildings from participants.

Some buildings in Saskatchewan have voluntarily participated in building benchmarking through Natural Resources Canada using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. As of 2016, there were 275 benchmarked buildings in Saskatchewan, covering 1,250,000 m2.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

Mandatory large building energy rating and disclosure: No
Voluntary building benchmarking and transparency program: No

Last reviewed: August 2020

Appliance and Equipment Market Transformation

Market transformation can be supported by activities such as product demonstrations, training and education of supply chain actors, and customer education through such devices as product labels

Alberta
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development - - -
Pilots and demonstrations - - -
Information and awareness - - -
Technology and installation training - - -
Upstream or downstream incentives - - -
Regulation, codes and standards - - -

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development FortisBC, BC Hydro, NRCan and the provincial government collaborated on a field study of sizing, specification, and installation practices for cold-climate heat pumps. The provincial government “High Performance Window Certification Program” provides funding to manufactures to offset research and development costs. -
Pilots and demonstrations The Esk’etemc First Nation partnered with The Government of Canada, First Nations Health Authority, Interior Health Authority, and BC Housing to fund and construct the Alkali Lake Health and Wellness centre, meeting Net-Zero Energy Ready labelling requirements. BC Hydro also provided support. - FortisBC, BC Hydro, NRCan and the province conducted a field study of in-situ heat pump water heaters in 2019.
Information and awareness BC Hydro has been engaged in the development of EXP-07, the CSA standard for heat pumps. Finalization of this standard precedes product listing, sizing, and selection tools. The CleanBC Better Homes Program requires energy performance rating for windows, consistent with CSA and NFRC product standards, and the Energy Star program. All windows sold in the province are subject to labelling requirements. BC Hydro, CleanBC, and FortisBC use qualified product lists developed by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance.
Technology and installation training FortisBC, BC Hydro, the Province of British Columbia (CleanBC), and the Home performance Stakeholder Council support contractor training on quality installation and are developing a Program Registered contractor directory that will be mandatory for rebate program participation Members of the Home Performance Stakeholder Council support windows installation quality training and consultation with Fenestration BC FortisBC works with water heater equipment manufactures to demonstrate new products but relies on them for installation guidelines.
Upstream or downstream incentives

BC Hydro, FortisBC, and the Province of British Columbia offer downstream incentives.

Through CleanBC, the province provides installer incentives for heat pumps.

The High Performance Window Certification Program provides funding for manufacturers to certify new ENERGY STAR® “Most Efficient” and “Passive House” product lines. Utilities and the province provide downstream incentives.
Regulation, codes and standards Energy efficiency requirements for heat pumps are regulated in Amendment 6 to the BC Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation. Higher energy efficiency requirements on windows, doors, skylights are regulated in Amendment 6 and the proposed Amendment 7 to the BC Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation. The province has proposed an amendment to the Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation that would introduce residential and commercial gas boiler standards, including combination boilers serving domestic and service hot water.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

 

Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development Field performance monitoring of central ducted cold climate heat pumps in three Winnipeg homes in 2016 and 2017. - Field performance monitoring of heat pump water heaters installed in two customer homes in 2016
Pilots and demonstrations - Efficiency Manitoba, Red River College, and industry partners obtained an NSERC grant to study cold climate installation techniques. One goal of this research is to develop practical installation guidelines to reduce thermal bridging at the window/wall junction. -
Information and awareness - Manitoba Hydro developed and led industry-sponsored presentations to educate industry on the benefits of high-performance windows, including customized presentations for individual companies to assist sales and marketing staff in promoting these products.  This work will continue at Efficiency Manitoba. -
Technology and installation training Manitoba Hydro and Efficiency Manitoba Earth Energy/Ground Source Heat Pump incentive programs require participating contractors and installers be members of the Manitoba Geothermal Energy Alliance (MGEA). Fenestration Manitoba provides ongoing training opportunities for all aspects of its business, from sales to installation. -
Upstream or downstream incentives Manitoba Hydro has provided downstream incentives for ground source heat pumps for several years. Efficiency Manitoba plans to switch to upstream incentives paid directly to distributors. Efficiency Manitoba provides downstream incentives.

Manitoba Hydro has promoted high efficiency condensing water heaters and provided downstream incentives to commercial customers.

Efficiency Manitoba will continue promoting them, but will be switching to upstream incentives direct to distributors.

Regulation, codes and standards Manitoba Hydro has participated in the CSA technical committee developing the EXP-07 and EXP-10 standards. Manitoba Hydro and Efficiency Manitoba staff are active participants in the development of the National Energy Code for Buildings at both the sub-committee (SC-EE) and task group (TG-BE) levels. -

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development - - -
Pilots and demonstrations - - -
Information and awareness - - -
Technology and installation training - - -
Upstream or downstream incentives NB Power provides downstream incentives for heat pumps NB Power provides downstream incentives for retrofits that include windows NB Power provides downstream incentives for water heaters.
Regulation, codes and standards New Brunswick regulates heat pumps under the Energy Efficiency Act, and is working to harmonize the legislation with federal standards. - New Brunswick regulates water heaters under the Energy Efficiency Act, and is updating legislation to harmonize with federal standards.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development - - -
Pilots and demonstrations Newfoundland Power is studying ductless mini-split heat pumps. - -
Information and awareness takeCharge incentive programs and LEED® Silver requirements for public buildings create market pull. TakeCharge incentive programs and LEED® Silver requirements for public buildings create market pull. -
Technology and installation training For provincial programs, heat pump installers must be journey refrigeration mechanics. Industry-led training includes windows. Industry-led training includes water heaters.
Upstream or downstream incentives The province offers downstream incentives for heat pumps. - -
Regulation, codes and standards - - -

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development - - -
Pilots and demonstrations Efficiency Nova Scotia partnered with Housing Nova Scotia and Nova Scotia Community College to pilot four hybrid thermal heat pump systems. Efficiency Nova Scotia is running a pilot program to provide additional incentives for new home construction that meets a specified performance level. Efficiency Nova Scotia partnered with NRCan, Nova Scotia Power, and the province to install and monitor performance of CO2-refrigerant split heat pump water heaters and conventional integrated heat pump water heaters.
Information and awareness Efficiency Nova Scotia’s programs require heat pumps to be Cold Climate certified, measured with internal criteria based on the North East Energy Partnership’s cold-climate heat pump list. Windows and doors must be ENERGY STAR® rated to be eligible for Efficiency Nova Scotia rebates. Efficiency Nova Scotia’s 2020-2022 DSM plan includes a focus on increasing uptake of domestic hot water measures.
Technology and installation training Efficiency Nova Scotia has hosted high performance building training sessions, which include information on selecting and installing space heating equipment. Efficiency Nova Scotia has hosted high performance building training sessions, which include information on selection and installation of high-performance windows. Efficiency Nova Scotia has hosted high performance building training sessions, which include information on selecting and installing water heating equipment.
Upstream or downstream incentives Efficiency Nova Scotia offers downstream incentives for heat pumps to both residential and commercial customers. Efficiency Nova Scotia provides downstream incentives for windows and doors. Efficiency Nova Scotia provides downstream rebates for integrated heat pump water heaters.
Regulation, codes and standards Efficiency Nova Scotia supports the development of CSA heat pump standards. - Efficiency Nova Scotia has provided support for CSA standards development.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

The 2018 market transformation road map notes that increased adoption of biomass and renewable heating sources could be attractive alternatives to technologies such as cold climate heat pumps in remote and northern communities.

The Arctic Energy Alliance’s Biomass Energy Program provides technical advice, project coordination, and education on biomass technologies, including district heating in local communities. Burn it Smart workshops familiarize people with energy efficiency wood stoves and their operation.

Arctic Energy Alliance tested water heating technologies with students at Aurora College to assess efficiency, lifecycle costs, budgets, and domestic needs.

In 2013, the Arctic Energy Alliance monitored the performance of solar air heating systems.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

No market or equipment market transformation activities identified.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development The IESO Grid Innovation Fund has supported research into geothermal systems and heat pumps, and Enbridge has supported research into heat pumps. The IESO has supported National Research Council work on lower-cost production techniques. -
Pilots and demonstrations The IESO Grid Innovation Fund has supported multiple heat pump pilot projects, including one in which the City of Toronto installed a commercial-scale, lake-based geothermal system as part of a deep energy retrofit of a neighborhood centre. EnerQuality, with support from the IESO, administers a “Net Zero Technology Adoption Program,” which works with home builders to design, develop and deliver market-ready technology demonstration projects. Enbridge has conducted residential pilots of smart water heater controllers and gas heat pump water heaters.
Information and awareness

Enbridge offers a “Savings by Design” program to improve new-building energy performance, and has participated in updating the ANSI Z21.40.2 and .4 standards for gas heat pumps. 

The IESO participated in the development of CSA EXP07 standards.

The EnerQuality initiative was developed because of industry expectation of code development, and desired assistance gaining expertise with designing and delivering high performance homes. Enbridge’s Savings by Design program (noted above) hosts a workshop that focuses on space and water heating improvements.
Technology and installation training - EnerQuality offers training to the residential new construction industry on the design and construction of high-performance homes. -
Upstream or downstream incentives

Heat pumps may be eligible under Enbridge’s Custom Retrofit commercial program.

Save on Energy incentives for residential electricity customers were cancelled in 2019, but remain in place for institutional, commercial and industrial buildings.

Utilities provide downstream incentives. Enbridge provides midstream incentives for commercial natural gas water heaters with a minimum efficiency of 94.5%.[1]
Regulation, codes and standards Amended O.Reg. 509/18 to increase efficiency standards for commercial and residential gas-fired boilers; commercial oil-fired boilers; residential gas-fired furnaces; and gas fireplaces. Ontario amended its Energy and Water Efficiency regulation (O.Reg. 509/18) to increase efficiency standards for residential windows and align with building code requirements. The province amended O.Reg 509/18 to set a standard for commercial oil-fired storage water heaters, and to update standards for commercial gas-fired storage water heaters and instantaneous water heaters (residential and commercial).

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development - - -
Pilots and demonstrations PEI partnered with Natural Resources Canada to conduct 16 field studies of cold-climate heat pumps between 2018 and 2020. - -
Information and awareness - - -
Technology and installation training - EfficiencyPEI arranged for window installation training to be provided by Summerhill to members of its Network of Excellence. -
Upstream or downstream incentives Efficiency PEI provides downstream incentives to residential and commercial clients. EfficiencyPEI’s Home Insulation Rebate program provides rebates for ENERGY STAR® rated windows and doors. EfficiencyPEI provides downstream incentives for hybrid hot water heaters.
Regulation, codes and standards - - -

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development Québec Hydro has conducted research into power management, large capacity heat pumps, and geothermal systems. - -
Pilots and demonstrations - - -
Information and awareness - Hydro Québec has promoted ENERGY STAR® windows and patio doors since 2007, and developed awareness campaigns for both customers and industry. -
Technology and installation training Hydro-Québec provides training for HILO technicians on space heating, but not specifically heat pumps. Hydro-Québec and the Association de vitrerie et fenestration du Québec launched a specialized training course in 2019 for window installers, leading to Fenestration Installation Technician (FIT) certification. -
Upstream or downstream incentives TEQ offers downstream incentives for ENERGY STAR® rated heat pumps through its Rénoclimat and Chauffez vert programs. Hydro-Québec provides training and awareness, and TEQ offers a downstream incentive for ENERGY STAR® certified windows and doors. Hydro Québec provides downstream incentives for three-element water heaters.
Regulation, codes and standards Hydro-Québec participated in the development of the CSA performance standard for split-system and single-package central air conditioners and heat pumps. Hydro Québec participated on the standards development committees, and the government is planning to amend energy efficiency standards to apply to devices or equipment that do not directly consume energy. -

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan
Space Heating Windows Water Heating
Research and development SaskEnergy co-funded lab and field testing for a natural gas cold climate heat pump in 2019 and 2020. - -
Pilots and demonstrations - - -
Information and awareness - - -
Technology and installation training SaskEnergy provided training on high efficiency space heating (above code) for SaskEnergy Network Members. - -
Upstream or downstream incentives - - SaskEnergy provides downstream incentives for commercial space and water heating.
Regulation, codes and standards - -

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

The Yukon government has provided support for cold-climate heat pump monitoring project (see Yukon, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Update, Jan 2016-June 2018, p. 10.)

Last reviewed: August 2020

Appliance and Equipment Standards

Federal standards apply to products that are imported or shipped between provinces, and provinces have jurisdiction over products sold within their borders. Provinces can contribute to appliance and equipment efficiency by setting standards for products not covered by federal regulations, and they can adopt more stringent standards than the federal government.

Alberta

Alberta harmonizes with federal energy efficiency regulations.

Last reviewed: August 2020

British Columbia

BC regulates appliance and equipment under the Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation (EESR) (BC Reg 14/2015) under the Energy Efficiency Act.

Recent changes under B.C. Reg 29/2018, deposited on March 6, 2018, added new and updated standards for gas fireplaces, residential heat pumps, general service lighting, fenestration and consumer electronic products. Since 2006 BC has regulated several products, including commercial boilers, fluorescent ballasts, line voltage thermostats, water heaters, windows, doors, and skylights, clothes washers and dishwashers, and small battery charging systems.

In 2019 the Province published regulatory impact statements and held public consultations for a proposed seventh amendment to the Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation. The propose amendment would introduce new standards for computers and monitors, updated standard for residential windows, a new standard for residential gas boilers, and an updated standard for commercial gas boilers. The proposed amendment also includes harmonization of the refrigerators, freezers and combination refrigerator-freezer standards with the federal government. 

Last reviewed: August 2020

Manitoba

Manitoba harmonizes with federal energy efficiency regulations, except for gas furnaces and boilers. The provincial furnace efficiency regulation requirement is 92% compared to the federal regulation which is now 95%.

Manitoba’s specific standards were made via regulation 181/2009 under The Energy Act, in force December 30, 2009. At the time, these standards were higher than federal minimum standards.

Last reviewed: August 2020

New Brunswick

New Brunswick regulates appliances and equipment through regulation 95-70 under the Energy Efficiency Act. The Government of New Brunswick’s website states that minimum levels of appliances and equipment will be upgraded on a two year cycle.  The province is currently working on updating this legislation to harmonize with the federally-regulated products and performance standards.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador harmonizes with federal appliance and equipment regulations.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia regulates the efficiency of appliances and equipment under section 5 of the Energy-efficient Appliances Act. Updates were made in 2008 under NS Reg 400/2008, and in 2012 under NS Reg 172/2012 to create efficiency standards for LED roadway lighting.

No updates have been made since 2008. Nova Scotia has endorsed the federal government work on the reconciliation agreement between the Federal Government and the Provinces and Territories to harmonize household appliances.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Northwest Territories

Northwest Territories harmonizes with federally regulated energy-using products.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Nunavut

Nunavut harmonizes with federally regulated energy-using products.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Ontario

Ontario has been regulating the energy efficiency of products and appliances for 30 years and was the first jurisdiction in Canada to implement efficiency regulation. The regulation also sets water efficiency standards for products which consume both energy and water. Ontario regulates over 80 products, more products than any other jurisdiction in Canada (including the federal government).

Many of Ontario’s regulatory policies, such as "rolling incorporation", "early compliance" and "equivalent testing standards" have been considered for adoption by other provincial and federal regulations.

Ontario sets minimum standards for energy and water efficiency for appliances and products sold in Ontario under O.Reg. 509/18 under the Electricity Act, 1998. The November 29, 2018 Made-in-Ontario Environment Plan committed to “ensure Ontario’s energy efficiency standards for appliances and equipment continue to be among the highest in North America”.

Since 2013, Ontario has updated its efficiency regulation 9 times setting and adopting new and enhanced efficiency standards for over 60 products. Most updates had the intent to harmonize standards with US Department of Energy regulations and federal regulations. The most recent updates are:

Regulatory Amendment Date of Amendment Environmental Registry # Key Implications

 O. Reg. 419/16

 

 

Filed - December 2, 2016,

In force, January 1, 2017

 

012-7871

 

Included new or enhanced efficiency standards for 14 products, including water efficiency requirements for 5 products, and revoked standards for one existing product

 

O. Reg. 448/17

 

Filed – Nov 24, 2017

 

In force - Jan 1, 2018

 

013-0812

 

Included new or enhanced efficiency standards for 12 products, including updates to the testing standard and/or energy efficiency requirements for 10 existing products and introducing requirements for 2 new products

 

O.Reg. 201/19 Filed - June 13, 2019

013-4675

Updated labeling requirements for two electronic products

Allowed alternative efficiency metrics for three existing water heating products

Excluded ultra-high definition (UHD) 8K televisions from television on-mode requirements.

Proposal Proposed Nov. 19 2019

019-0924

Increase minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and harmonize Ontario’s efficiency standards for nine space and water heating products with Natural Resources Canada, and increase MEPS for one product (residential windows) to align with Ontario Building Code minimum requirements.

Products are not covered by federal regulations if they are manufactured and sold within the province, or if there is no federal standard. The following products were regulated by Ontario, but not by the federal government, as of June 30, 2020 (products marked with * are in the federal regulation but standards do not take effect until a future date, between July 1, 2020 and January 1, 2025, depending on the product):

Residential and commercial appliances:
• Gas-fired clothes dryer
• Drinking water cooler
• Vending machine, other than refrigerated bottled or canned beverage

Water heating products:
• Gas water heater, storage, commercial*
• Gas water heater, instantaneous, commercial*
• Electric water heater, instantaneous, residential
• Gas and oil pool heater

Space heating equipment/products:
• Gas furnace, commercial
• Gas boiler, commercial*
• Oil boiler, commercial*
• Gas room heater, wall furnace, floor furnace

Air-conditioning equipment/products:
• Liquid-to-liquid geothermal heat pump
• Computer room air conditioner

Lighting products:
• Fluorescent lamp, self-ballasted compact and ballasted adapter
• Incandescent lamps, candelabra & intermediate screw base
• Luminaires: roadway, high-mast and dusk-to-dawn

Motors and transformers:
• Power transformer, liquid
• Distribution transformer, liquid

Other
• Thermostat for room electric space heater
• Residential windows

Regulations that exceed federal standards
The following Ontario standards exceed federal standards due to higher minimum energy performance standards or by applying to a broader range of product types:

• Geothermal liquid-to-air heat pump
• Internal water loop heat pump
• Incandescent lamp
• Induction motor, three-phase
• Television

Last reviewed: August 2020

Prince Edward Island

PEI harmonizes with federally regulated energy-using products.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Quebec

Québec regulates appliances and equipment under The Act respecting energy efficiency and energy conservation standards for certain electrical and hydrocarbon-fuelled appliances (chapter N-1.01).

Regulation OC 434-2017, adopted on May 3, 2017 and in force August 15, 2017 strengthened regulations, and added new products not previously regulated, by harmonizing with federal standards. The changes also regulated products not currently regulated by the federal government (e.g. specific television). This regulation also requires manufacturers to keep a registry of testing and standards adherence. The last modernization of Québec’s regulations was in 1995.

Regulation OC 1394-2018 adopted Dec 12, 2018, and in force December 27, 2018 automatically updates Québec’s regulations to harmonize with federal regulations.

In December 2019, Quebec ratified the Regulatory Conciliation Agreement on energy efficiency standards for household appliances negotiated within the framework of the CEFTA. The process for the adoption of the agreement by the government is underway. In addition, government policy, regulatory and administrative relief favors the harmonization of MEPS of household appliances.

The TEQ Master Plan calls for federal harmonization as well as extending the scope of regulations with an energy efficiency or GHG reduction potential in Québec noting areas such as doors and windows without federal regulations.

Regulated Products not covered by federal regulations
Quebec has regulated thermostats not covered by federal regulations.

Regulations that exceed federal standards
Products include

  • thermostats
  • standard lamps

Last reviewed: August 2020

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan harmonizes with federally regulated energy-using products.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Yukon

Yukon harmonizes with federally regulated energy-using products.

Last reviewed: August 2020

Efficiency Requirements for Government Supported Housing

Setting efficiency requirements will help keep government supported housing affordable and healthy, while supporting the high-performance housing sector.

Alberta

The Affordable Housing Energy Savings program allocates $25 M to retrofit provincial and municipally owned affordable housing stock. $9 M is from the Low-Carbon Economy Leadership Fund.

Last reviewed: August 2019

British Columbia

New Construction projects supported by BC Housing have standards based on the BC Energy Step Code. Buildings 3 stories or less must meet step 4; larger buildings less than 7 stories must meet step 2-4, depending on climate zone, and buildings 7 stories or greater must meet step 2-3, depending on climate zone.

A 30-point housing plan was released in February 2018 as part of the provincial budget, which included investing $1.1 billion over 10 years to retrofit affordable housing. It was announced in November 2018 that $400 M of this is dedicated to improving energy efficiency.

CleanBC also administers two programs to support energy efficiency retrofits and in new construction of social housing, which complement similar programs administered by provincial utilities.

Last reviewed: August 2018

Manitoba

The “design guidelines for multi-unit affordable and social housing”, dated November 2017, require new buildings to qualify for the Power Smart Designation from Manitoba Hydro’s new buildings program. The program requires new buildings to be at least 10% more efficient than the Manitoba Energy Code for Buildings 2013, which followed the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings.

Last reviewed: August 2019

New Brunswick

The Province of New Brunswick Green Building Policy for New Construction & Major Renovation Projects contains mandatory guidelines for provincially funded social housing projects. The policy was released in 2010 and revised in 2011. New homes must achieve a minimum EnerGuide rating of 83 (or follow prescriptive guidelines). It also recommends homes be solar ready and to use materials produced using recycled content, that are produced regionally.[1]

In July 2018, New Brunswick announced a new 10-year housing agreement with the federal government to invest $300 M in social housing. This investment includes upgrades. No efficiency related targets or budgets to improve energy efficiency in particular are noted.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador’s 2009 Social Housing Plan, titled Secure Foundations, notes improving energy efficiency to current standards as part of general upgrades. Repairs and renovations continue to be supported in the province through federal and provincial funds. There are no specific budgets earmarked for energy efficiency, or efficiency standards for new or existing buildings noted in provincial policy documents.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Nova Scotia

There is no policy or standard for government supported housing, though housing Nova Scotia has built homes to the Passive House Standard.

A 2016 Social Infrastructure Fund agreement between the province and the federal government will invest $75 M in affordable housing over the 2016-17 and 2017-18 fiscal years. $18.2 M was earmarked for “retrofit and renovation”, which could include “improving the energy and water efficiency”.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Northwest Territories

The Arctic Energy Alliance operates the “Community Government Building Energy Retrofit Program”. This program had a $200,000 budget in 2017/18, funded by the Government of NWT Department of Infrastructure.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Nunavut

The 2007 Energy Strategy calls for a strategy to retrofit all economically appropriate, existing housing units owned by the Nunavut Housing Corporation.

The Housing New Buildings Program, discussed in the 2007 Energy Strategy, discusses a 10-year housing program being negotiated with the federal government that will mandate new housing to be built at a level 25% above code requirements.

Announced in September 2018, The Nunavut Housing Corporation is undertaking retrofits and installing district heating systems in the communities of Sanikiluaq and Taloyoak. This is a $12 M investment, using the $31 M for Nunavut under the federal Low-Carbon Leadership Fund.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Ontario

There are no efficiency requirements for government supported housing in Ontario. 

Last reviewed: August 2019

Prince Edward Island

The PEI Housing Action Plan 2018-2023 list an action item to “explore mandating new affordable housing units to be built to a to-be-defined energy efficiency standard” over 2019-2023.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Quebec

Standards
The 2017-2021 Strategic Plan of La Société d’habitation du Québec notes improvements energy efficiency to contribute to government priorities.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Saskatchewan

No requirements identified.

Last reviewed: August 2019

Yukon

No requirements identified.

Last reviewed: August 2019

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