Enabling Policies 

Enabling policies refer to policies, regulations, and other activities that build supportive infrastructure and policy frameworks to advance energy efficiency in a province.

Support for Financing

Provinces can provide support for financing through initiatives such as local improvement charges, soft loans, on-bill financing, loan guarantees, or by estalishing ‘green banks’.

Alberta

PACE Financing

The Clean Energy Improvement Program (CEIP) is a Property Assessed Clean Energy Program that makes it easier for property owners to overcome these barriers. Between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2020, three Alberta municipalities passed CEIP enabling bylaws (two in 2019 and one in 2020).

Last reviewed: October 2021

British Columbia

PACE Financing

The province allocated $2 million in economic recovery funding for the development of a PACE Roadmap and Pilot Program in September 2020.

The District of Saanich is developing a PACE/LIC pilot program with funding from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Real Estate Foundation of BC

Programs

CleanBC Better Homes Low-interest Financing program offers financing for heat pumps ranging from $1,000 to $40,000, a 60-month amortization period, and rates between 0% and 4.99% (depending on the efficiency of the heat pump). Further details are available here: https://betterhomesbc.ca/rebates/financing/

FortisBC offers a Heat Pump Loan program to help customers upgrade from an electric furnace or baseboards to a high-efficiency air-source heat pump. Participants can borrow up to $6,500 at 1.9% interest. Further details are available here: https://www.fortisbc.com/rebates/home/air-source-heat-pump-loan

Green bonds

FortisBC announced in July 2020 it would complete a public offering of a Green Bond. Under the company’s Green Bond Framework, proceeds from such bonds can be used to finance or refinance new or existing projects offering tangible environmental benefits. Eligible project categories include renewable energy; renewable natural gas; energy efficiency; pollution prevention and control; and clean transportation.

On July 9, 2020, FortisBC Energy (the natural gas subsidiary of FortisBC) issued a $200 million, 30-year bond. These funds were used to support renewable natural gas projects (~$7 million), demand-side management initiatives (~$177 million), and incentives for natural gas use in on-road transportation vehicles and LNG marine vessels (~$15 million) incurred up to 36 months prior to the bond issuance.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Manitoba

PACE Financing
No policies identified

Programs
The Home Energy Efficiency Loan provides residential customers on-bill financing to offset the large capital expenditures of some energy efficiency upgrades. The program supports technologies that may be eligible for Efficiency Manitoba incentive programs further reducing financial barriers and also supports emerging technologies that may not pass cost effectiveness testing or have incentive programs developed. Maximum terms range from five to 15 years, depending on the upgrade, with an interest rate of 4.8% for the first five years of the loan.

Last reviewed: October 2021

New Brunswick

No support for financing identified.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

PACE Financing
None identified.

Programs
Between 2017 and 2020, the Energy Efficiency Loan Program offered low-interest loans that could be financed on utility bills. Qualifying customers received financing from their utility for heat pumps, insulation or home energy assessments. Eligible applicants could receive financing for up to $10,000 over five years at an interest rate of prime plus 1.5%. The program had a total of 482 participants through its lifetime.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Nova Scotia

PACE Financing
The Municipal Government Act was amended in 2010 to authorize PACE loans. Section 81A enabled municipal councils to make by-laws to enforce charges on private property, with the consent of the property owner and section 65(aca) notes the potential to finance energy efficiency equipment installations, including solar panels.

Starting in 2013, a Halifax program called “Solar City” financed solar hot water installations through a local improvement charge. This was the first program to use LIC funding on a large scale, supported by the Canadian Federation of Municipalities Green Municipal Fund.

PACE financing programs are now available in over 10 municipalities in Nova Scotia. The Clean Energy Program, operated by the Clean Foundation, provides PACE financing in the Town of Bridgewater, District of Lunenburg, District of Digby, District of Barrington, District of Yarmouth, Municipality of Cumberland, and the Town of Amherst, and other municipalities offer it through other organizations, with support from the government.

Efficiency Nova Scotia’s My Energy Improvement Plan PACE Program offers full design, implementation and administration of PACE on a not-for-profit basis.

The Town of Bridgwater is exploring program expansion opportunities to allow even deeper energy retrofits through the Clean Net Zero program, which is currently in the pilot phase.

PACE Atlantic CIC was founded in May 2020 under Nova Scotia’s trailblazing legislation for Community Interest Corporations. Community Interest Corporations (CIC) are a unique form of private incorporation that operate between the 100% for profit and the non-profit world. They operate with a mandate to provide a public good and the requirement to reinvest 60% of distributable profit for community benefit.  

Programs

In the non-residential sector, Efficiency Nova Scotia offers on-bill financing options for non-residential customers, as well as financing options for the Home Energy Assessment program for residential customers.

NS Power also offers on-bill financing for heat pumps, with terms ranging from three to 12 years at an interest rate of 7%. More details are available at https://www.nspower.ca/your-home/energy-products/heat-pumps/financing

Last reviewed: October 2021

Northwest Territories

No support for financing identified.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Nunavut

Under the Nunavut Housing Corporation’s Home Renovation Program participants can receive a forgivable loan to cover the cost of materials, freight and labour, to a maximum contribution of $65,000, depending on household income, and provided that any amount exceeding $50,000 is used specifically for energy efficient improvements.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Ontario

PACE Finance
PACE or “local improvement charge” financing was enabled in 2012 through Ontario Regulation 586/06. A clause was added to the definition of “work” to include “constructing energy efficiency works or renewable energy works”, and to include the “conservation of water”.

The City of Toronto Act was also amended under O. Reg 323/12 to enable PACE finance.

In March 2014, Toronto launched a pilot PACE program called Home Energy Loan Program (HELP). Through HELP, Toronto homeowners can get a low-interest loan of up to $75,000 to cover the cost of home energy improvements,

Green Bank
The Green Ontario Fund or Ontario Climate Change Solutions Deployment Corporation was originally discussed as a “green bank”, but they did not offer any substantive financing programs before its programs were wound down in late 2018.

The November 2018 Ontario Environment Plan proposes creating the “Ontario Carbon Trust” which will “leverage private investment” and “utilize innovative and financing techniques and market development tools in partnership with the private sector”.

Green Bonds
The Ontario Financing Authority regularly issues green bonds, the proceeds of which are used to support projects in clean transportation; energy efficiency and conservation; clean energy and technology; forestry, agriculture, and land management; and climate adaptation and resilience. In 2020, two bonds were issued, raising a total of $2 billion, though official reporting does not indicate the amounts spent specifically on energy efficiency and conservation initiatives.  No other province reported issuing green bonds in 2020.

Ontario, through the Ontario Financing Authority, has issued “green bonds” six times since 2015 totalling $4.7 billion. The bonds have financed 22 energy efficiency projects.

On-Bill Financing
Enbridge Gas was directed to provide “Open Bill Access”. This allows third party companies to use the utility bill to charge for services provided. The program is now called the Enbridge Rate Zone. In April 2020, the Ontario Energy Board approved an application from Enbridge to continue this program until 2023

Last reviewed: October 2021

Prince Edward Island

PACE financing
Municipalities of Stratford and Charlottetown in PEI, and the Town of Wolfville in Nova Scotia, launched the first 'multi-provincial' PACE program in early 2021.

Programs
The Energy Efficiency Loan Program provides financing for homeowners who are approved applicants under either of efficiencyPEI’sEnergy Efficient Equipment Rebate and Home Insulation Rebate programs. Maximum Loan value is $10,000, with a fixed interest rate of 5% per annum and a 7-year term.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Quebec

Green Bonds
Quebec has undertaken five green bond issues since its inaugural issue in February 2017, totalling $2.8 billion. Projects have primarily focused on public transit, and targeted to institutional investors. Épargne Placements Québec (an organization that issues savings and retirement products from the Quebec government) issues fixed-rate green bonds, intended for the retail market.

Programs
SOFIAC was officially launched in January 2021 by Fondaction and Econoler. The Quebec Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources supported this initiative with a start- up grant of $ 5.5 million. SOFIAC offers a financing and technical support solution to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors for the energy efficient modernization of infrastructure.The 2021-2026 Green Economy Plan also contains a measure aimed at identifying the most promising forms of innovative financing and supporting their emergence.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Saskatchewan

PACE financing 
The City of Saskatoon introduced the Home Energy Loan Program to support energy efficiency, renewable energy, and reduced water use in 2021.

Third-Party Financing
SaskEnergy Network Members offer financing on natural gas appliances. Loan amounts range from $1,000 to $60,000, with one-to-five-year terms and up to a 15-year amortization period, but there is no on-bill repayment.  In 2020-21, 460 participants accessed this financing, totaling $2.95 million.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Yukon

PACE Finance
Yukon pioneered the use of Local Improvement Charges through the Rural Electrification and Telecommunications loan program to assist residents living in rural areas to extend electrical grid and telephone services (and later internet) to rural properties in 1984. This was later used to fund on-site renewable energy systems.

Last reviewed: October 2021

Research and Development

Continuing research, development and demonstration (RD&D) of novel energy efficiency technologies and experimenting with innovative program designs and delivery methods is essential to realizing the full energy savings potential of energy efficiency.

Alberta

Dedicated innovation funding

Alberta Innovates funds research, development, and demonstration of new technologies to reduce the environmental footprint of many sectors in the province. There is no specific program or focus area on “energy efficiency”, however projects may have components which improve energy efficiency.

Pilots, projects and demonstrations

A $50 million TIER economic recovery program was launched, seeking shovel-ready projects to reduce GHG emissions. Twenty-three projects were selected in 2020, which included process improvements in the oil and gas industry that reduce energy consumption.

Emissions Reduction Alberta announced 11 projects selected under its Industrial Efficiency Challenge in 2019. Since then, one project (using flow-control devices to reduce energy intensity) has been completed, and two were cancelled.

Program innovation

Alberta Innovates and partners established the Green Buildings Technology Network, a network of test buildings for small and medium-sized construction firms to develop new innovations in energy-efficient construction through testing, commercializing and adoption of new products and technologies.

Last reviewed: October 2021

British Columbia

Dedicated innovation funding

The BC government maintained a Building Innovation Fund ($8m in 2020-2021) to promote innovation in design, construction practices, systems, and materials/technologies.

FortisBC included funding for an Innovative Technology program in its current DSM plan, alongside other funds such as the InnoTech program, and the Clean Growth Innovation Fund.

Pilots, projects and demonstrations

BC Hydro supported several pilot and demonstration programs in DSM, including the BC Local Energy Efficiency Partnership Program (LEEP) and piloting a demand response management system.

FortisBC launched commercial gas heat pump and residential gas heat pump pilot programs and plans to launch a rebate program in 2021 to provide incentives for water and space heating applications of commercial gas heat pumps.

Program innovation

BC Hydro is participating in a number of activities to support and facilitate the province's electrification objectives, in part through building energy retrofits.

Beginning in 2021, FortisBC will conduct a two-year study of deep energy retrofit pilots for residential and commercial buildings, and intends to partner with NRCan, the City of Kelowna and Lightspark to geo-spacially model building energy intensities.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

Dedicated innovation funding

Efficiency Manitoba’s current three-year DSM Plan includes an Innovation and Research Fund that was allocated $2.139 million to provide funding for pilot projects and research partnerships. A draft strategy and public engagement was completed in 2020, and the Fund is due to be launched in 2021.

Pilots, projects and demonstrations

Efficiency Manitoba is providing funding for a feasibility study to convert Specified Risk Material (organic waste) from a cattle processing facility to an energy source using Rapid Organic Converter (ROC) technology.

The process converts waste products to heat which is used to heat process hot water at the facility. This energy source will displace natural gas and reduce or eliminate the need to transport waste materials to landfill.

Program innovation

Efficiency Manitoba has a deep energy retrofit pilot program to target buildings requiring comprehensive upgrades and enhancements and is currently implementing a new demand-side management tracking system to optimize program delivery and deployment. In June 2021, Efficiency Manitoba began offering residential customers a virtual home energy assessment tool.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

Dedicated innovation funding

The province has supported several RD&D energy-related projects, including for smart thermostats and thermal insulation.

NB Power includes an Enabling Strategies budget in its DSM planning, which can be used for planning, evaluation, and market transformation.

Program innovation

The Smart Grid Innovation Network is a partnership between NB Power, the University of New Brunswick, and Siemens Canada that has supported RD&D in a number of smart grid related areas. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

Pilots, projects and demonstrations

NL Hydro concluded a pilot where 124 smart thermostats were installed and used to control heating to complete demand response events in L'Anse au Loup.

Newfoundland Power has been conducting a study on ductless mini split heat pumps using a control group. The results will be available in the fall of 2021.

Program innovation 

NL Hydro plans to begin using Simptek B360 to complete virtual energy audits in isolated diesel communities. The goal is to perform energy analyses of ~50% of commercial and residential customers in selected regions to identify the top 10% highest energy use of residential and commercial customers and develop customized plans to reduce their energy use.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

Dedicated innovation funding

Efficiency Nova Scotia includes an Enabling Strategies budget in its DSM plan. The budget can be used to support education and outreach, development and research, and other related activities.

Pilots, projects, and demonstrations

In 2020, work continued on the locational DSM (“Klondike”) pilot, for customers in the Kentville area. The province provided enhanced incentives through five existing programs.

Program innovation

The province continued its research into the feasibility of virtual energy audits to assess efficiency of electrically heated homes. The work included designing of the virtual audit report, configurating and installing the necessary back-end technology, and launching virtual audit reports more than 1,000 homes in 2020.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

No information available.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

No information available.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

Dedicated innovation funding
The IESO’sGrid Innovation Fund, with an annual budget of $9.5 million, supports projects enabling customers to manage energy consumption and/or projects toreduce the costs associated with maintaining grid reliability.

Enbridge Gas' OEBapproved DSM Plan Includes funding of up to $2.5 million annually for Research, Development,Innovation, and Pilot Program related spending.

Pilots, projects, and demonstrations
The IESO, working with Alectra (and funding from Natural Resources Canada) ran a first-of-kind in Canada (and likely North America) local capacity auction in 2020.

The IESO’s Grid Innovation Fund also supported a number of projects in energy efficiency, grid modernization, and training and professionalization.  This includes, but is not limited to, a heat pump demonstration project for multi-unit residential buildings (administered by Toronto Atmospheric Fund), and a deep energy retrofit of the City of Toronto’s Waterfront Neighbourhood Centre.

Enbridge supported several pilot and demonstration activities in 2020, involving technologies such as cold climate heat pumps, hydronic heating systems, artificial intelligence, gas heat pump furnaces, and virtual energy audits.

Program innovation
Enbridge conducted a pilot program to test the accuracy and potential energy savings identified by virtual energy assessments compared to traditional in-person audits.

Several projects funded by the IESO’s Grid Innovation Fund concern program administration or delivery, including a strategic energy management project by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and a project to enhance RETScreen for energy professionals in Ontario (with CanmetENERGY).

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

Dedicated innovation funding
Efficiency PEI included an enabling strategies fund in its 2018-2021 DSM Plan, totaling approximately $815,000 over the three years. The province has supported research on cold climate heat pumps and energy storage.

Pilots, projects, and demonstrations
efficiencyPEI completed the Cold-Climate Heat Pump Study with NRCan and continued to support the STASH Energy Storage project with the City of Summerside Electric Utility.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Dedicated innovation funding
The Hydro-Québec Research Institute (IREQ) includes “energy use” as a core area of expertise. The Energy Technology Laboratory (LTE) in Shawinigan focused on technological innovation with respect to energy efficiency.

The Centre d'excellence en efficacité énergétique provides funding support for energy efficiency RD&D in the transportation sector. The National Gas Technologies Centre undertakes research on energy efficiency.

The Synchronex network of college scientific and technological experts includes an energy group, which works with various research centres to offer integrated and innovative solutions to meet the needs of local businesses. For more details, see: https://synchronex.ca/site/web/en/experts/energy-team

​​The provincial government administers the Technoclimat program, to encourage the development of technological innovations in energy efficiency, renewable energies, bioenergy and the reduction of GHG emissions.

On the natural gas side, the NGTC does similar work as IREQ. Energir also administers an Innovation program that provides up to $25,000 for experimental projects, and up to $250,000 for demonstration projects.

Pilots, projects, and demonstrations
Hydro Québec invested in a 'test bench' to design control strategies for a large-capacity heat pump, the installation of an ultra-efficient electric oven in an industrial bakery, and the transformation of its Shawinigan laboratory to showcase equipment for commercial buildings.  Hydro-Québec is also testing a central thermal storage technology with residential customers in Montreal West, using dual energy or fuel oil alone. 

With funding from the provincial government, a large-scale aggregation project (605 housing units) was launched in the northern village of Inukjuak, converting oil heating to dual-energy heating systems primarily powered by electricity.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

Dedicated innovation funding
SaskEnergy has a dedicated budget for Technology Innovation, focused on energy savings and GHG reductions.  The budget can be used for both end-use energy efficiency and transportation, as well as fuel switching and reducing GHGs associated with the fuel itself. 

Pilots, projects, and demonstrations
SaskEnergy invested in combined heat and power and heat pump technology development, including providing funding for the construction of the first net-zero multi-unit residential building in Saskatchewan with natural gas furnaces, solar panels, and electric heat pumps.

SaskPower completed a Proof of Concept to demonstrate AI-powered data disaggregation technology using AMI data. The technology provides customer-centric solutions to help customers manage electrical use.

Program innovation
SaskPower ran a pilot program with the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation to provide free home retrofits in Southend, SK. Energuide home audits were performed on each participating home.

Several universities conduct energy research and development in Saskatchewan. SaskEnergy provides funding for cleantech innovation and research annually. SaskTel works on the delivery of innovative energy-efficiency projects in partnership with Greenwave Innovations. The Saskatchewan Advantage Innovation Fund is managed by Innovation Saskatchewan to support technological innovations in core economic sectors, one of which is energy.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Program innovation

There was a study from 2011-2017 on the thermal performance and durability of vacuum insulated panels building envelopes in Canada’s north.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Lead by Example

Governments can set an example by setting aggressive targets and undertaking energy efficiency improvements in publicly-owned buildings and vehicle fleets.

Alberta

Buildings
LEED Silver is the minimum standard for all new major construction projects since 2006.

The provincial government certified 89 buildings under the BOMA BEST program, and three government-owned buildings have achieved the BOMA BEST Platinum rating.

Vehicle Fleets
No policies found

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

Buildings
BC committed to reducing public sector building emissions by 50%  by 2030. All BC public sector organizations have a legislated requirement to be carbon neutral. This requirement includes all health authorities, K-12 schools, universities and colleges, Crown corporations, core ministries and independent offices. 

Since 2010, new public sector buildings have been built to LEED Gold certification or equivalent. The BC Energy Step Code outlines a pathway to net-zero energy ready buildings, and the public sector is investigating how best to implement the Step Code to public sector buildings, including hospitals and clinics, schools, campuses and office buildings.

Carbon neutral government initiatives promote behavioural changes that conserve energy such as use of video conferencing rather than travel and promoting bike to work week.

Energy use and benchmarking for core-government buildings is managed by the government’s facilities management outsourced service partner’s platforms. BC Public Sector is carbon neutral since 2008. Under this program, the BC government tracks energy consumption metrics like actual consumption, weather normalized consumption and building energy performance index (BEPI) internally then this information is shared with Climate Action Secrectariat's (Min. of Environment & Climate change Strategy) Clean Government Reporting Tool and Carbon Neutral Action Reports.

Public sector buildings also undergo retrofits regularly and achieve energy efficiency improvements by taking advantage of latest proven technologies. The public sector is encouraged to considering using wood in new building construction, in part to reduce embodied carbon in buildings.

Vehicles

BC committed to reducing emissions from its fleet vehicles by 40% 2030 in CleanBC, which will largely be achieved by right-sizing and electrification.

The public sector carbon neutrality requirement includes fleet emissions within scope. Organizations must report on emissions from all fleet vehicles, include marine, transit and school buses, off-road and road vehicles. Emissions from transit and school buses do not have to be offset.

BC recently signed onto the Express Lane of the West Coast Electric Vehicle Pledge. This pledge commits BC to have 10% of light duty vehicle purchases to be electric vehicles. Additionally, BC committed to reducing emissions from its fleet vehicles by 40% 2030 in CleanBC. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

Buildings

Manitoba has a GHG reduction target of 45,000 tCO2e for the 5 year Carbon Savings Account period (2018-2022). The reduction target applies to total reductions from buildings and fleet.

Manitoba's Green Building Program establishes requirements for government funded projects. It requires
Buildings be designed to a targeted energy efficiency level of at least 10% better than the Manitoba Energy Code for Buildings. Building design must achieve the targeted level of energy efficiency verified by achieving designation under the Efficiency Manitoba, New Buildings Program.

All government reporting entities (departments, school divisions, health authorities, colleges, universities, Manitoba Housing and crowns) must track and report annual building energy use, water use and fuel use for greenhouse gas emission reporting required under the Climate and Green Plan Act. Not all reporting entities use a energy management program/software however many investigating options.

Vehicle Fleets
A fleet vehicle reorganization program was announced in October 2018 will removed 400 vehicles from the governments fleet. Staff are be encouraged to reduce travel time by using video and conference calls when possible. Monitoring devices (AVL) have been installed in passenger vehicles to track practices such as idling, speed, and fuel consumption. Currently government departments monitor employee driving behaviors in efforts to influence fuel efficient driving to reduce fuel use and costs, vehicle maintenance and GHGs.

Other
Manitoba's Climate and Green Plan Act established the Low Carbon Government Office (LCGO). It has a mandate to track and report GHG emissions for buildings, fleet and equipment. LCGO also has responsibilities to recommend "opportunities" that will reduce government's GHG emissions and promote sustainable operations in each of the following areas: procurement, building design, contruction and maintenance, fleet emission reduction, information and IT and waste reduction and management at government operations.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

Buildings
Under the Green Building Policy larger buildings (floor area greater than 2,000 m2) shall achieve a minimum LEED silver certification, or Green Globes standard. Buildings with floor area between 1,000-2,000 m2 shall meet a prescribe programs designed to reduce energy savings by at least 20-30% beyond the 1997 Model National Energy Code for Buildings, and meet the intent of the LEED Canada-NC requirements. Smaller buildings (floor area between 500-999 m2) have prescriptive requirements based on “Advanced Building Core Performance” Guide requirements.

The province’s most recent Climate Change Action Plan lists a number of actions for provincial buildings, including strengthening the Green Building Policy to include higher performance standards for energy efficiency.

Fleets
The Green Vehicle Policy was adopted in 2008, requires that replacement vehicles be in the top 10% in their class for fuel efficiency, with extra incentives to purchase hybrid electric vehicles, and restrictions on non-hybrid SUV and pick-ups.

The province’s most recent Climate Change Action Plan indicates the government will develop a green transportation policy to electrify government fleets, implement new fleet procurement practices, and promote a culture of minimized travel for public servants.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

Buildings
The 2011 Building Better Buildings Policy commits to ensuring that government-funded buildings that were built, or received substantial renovations, exceed the 1997 Model National Energy Code for Buildings by 25%, strive to achieve a LEED Silver standard, and complete a life-cycle project analysis.

Vehicle Fleets
NL Hydro currently has one EV in its fleet, with two more being purchased in 2021. NL Hydro's intends to continue integrating more EV's into their fleet each year, with a target to have a minimum of 42 fleet EV's in use by the year 2030.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

Buildings
As of November 2008, all building construction financed by the government of Nova Scotia will be designed and constructed to a minimum LEED Silver standard, an energy efficiency improvement 35% above the 1997 Model National Building Code. Buildings must also provide a post-occupancy comparison of target efficiencies.

Efficiency Nova Scotia’s Onsite Energy Management program includes benchmarking participatory organization’s energy use against similar organizations - Housing Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Health Authority and TIR Buildings.

The NS Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is using Energy Star Portfolio Manager to benchmark nearly 80 department owned buildings as part of the Energy Conservation Program.1  This benchmarking initiative is associated with a building recommissioning project.

Vehicle Fleets
An April 2013 Strategy “Choose how you move” states that it will require provincial infrastructure initiatives, including buildings, schools, road facilities, to be planned, located, and designed in a way that supports sustainable transportation goals. 

ReThink: Greener Choices at Work is an internal government sustainability initiative that proposes active transportation infrastructure in government buildings (e.g. bike racks and showers), encouragement of active and public transportation, and managing fleets by right-sizing and purchasing best-in-class vehicles and exploring shared resources between departments.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

Buildings
Target to exceed the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings by 10% for new government buildings established. The draft 2030 Energy Strategy, released in August 2017, states that government is reviewing the 2015 Model National Energy Code for Buildings to reach new targets. Capital Asset Retrofit Fund (CARF) is a rolling fund targeted at government buildings.

Vehicle Fleets
The 2030 Energy Strategy commits to fleet management, including right-sizing vehicles, assessing integration of hybrid and LNG vehicles into government fleet, use of fleet management software, training on fuel efficient driving, and pilot auxiliary heaters to reduce idling.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

Buildings
Nunavut Energy Management Program creates a 20% reduction target in energy consumption in buildings owned by the Department of Community and Government Services. The 2007 Energy Strategy also calls for retrofitting all government owned in Iqualuit, followed by other territorial communities, and retrofits in municipal buildings and buildings owned by the Nunavut Housing Corporation.

The Good Practices Energy Guide provides guidance on energy management in government buildings.

The Government of Nunavut New Commercial Building Program discussed in the 2007 Energy Strategy calls on the government to seek ways to mandate a minimum rating in all new buildings, referencing LEED and the need to consider arctic conditions.

Vehicle Fleets
The 2007 Energy Strategy discussed a 5% reduction target for government-related travel.

Last reviewed:  November 2021

Ontario

Buildings
The Ontario government’s Environment Plan, released in November 2018, includes several commitments related to integrating climate change into government decision making.  The plan commits to developing a Climate Change Governance Framework, which will include reporting on climate change measures, procurement changes, continued execution of a high-performance building strategy, investments in energy cost savings such as meeting LEED standards, optimizing office space use, advanced automation and integration to measure, monitor, and control operations and maintenance at the lowest cost, and developing tools to help decision makers better understand climate impacts.

The Broader Public Service has been required to report on building energy use annually since 2012, originally under O. Reg 397/11 under the Green Energy Act and re-enacted after the Green Energy Repeal Act, 2018 passed. There is a high-performance building automation strategy for government buildings, noted in the 2018 Environment Plan. The Environment Plan calls for future renovations of government buildings maximize energy cost savings. For instance, Ontario is building new correctional facilities to meet LEED standards.

Vehicle Fleets
The Ontario government’s Environment Plan notes continued support for purchase of electric ferries, connecting Wolfe and Amherst Islands to the mainland. The Ontario Environment Plan reports that 70% of its passenger vehicle fleet is comprised of plug-in hybrid and battery electric vehicles.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

Buildings
ePEI provides funding under the Greening Government program to Government to facilitate energy effiiency upgrades.  Annual budget of $500,000.

The PEI Climate Change Secretariat has endorsed utilizing NECB 2017 for all new government owned buildings.  Government to building net-zero buildings. The Sherwood Elementary School project will be the Province's first Net-Zero Building.

Energy use tracking
All projects funded under the Greening Government Program require the use of the Energy Star Portfolio Manager for the facility under renovation. The 2018 Climate Action plans commits to implementing a greening government program and developing a GHG emissions inventory for the government. It also commits to installing 20 additional biomass heating systems in public buildings.

Vehicle Fleets
The 2018 Climate Action Plan commits to increasing the use of electric vehicles in its light-duty vehicle fleet.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Buildings
The TEQ Master Plan calls for mandatory recommissioning of public building mechanical systems and public disclosure of public building energy data.

The TEQ Master Plan calls for converting all building fossil fuel use for heat to renewable energy. No public buildings should be principally heated by fuel oil by 2023, except in rare circumstances.

The 2013-2020 Action Plan on climate change calls for obtaining an energy performance in new buildings 20% higher than the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings, and also set objectives related to eliminating fuel oil use in public buildings.

The TEQ Master Plans (p. 159) calls for reducing energy use intensity (GJ/m2) of all public buildings by 10% in 2022-2023, and by 15% in 2029-2030 (base year 2012-2013). Specific targets are also given to the main institutional sectors, including health and social services, education, and social housing.

The 2013-2020 Action Plan on climate change calls for obtaining an energy performance in new buildings 20% higher than the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings.

Energy consumption is monitored annually and the information is published on the government of Quebec's website in the form of a written report and a downloadable Excel file. The information is presented globally and by major sector (health and social services network, education network, higher education network, Société québécoise des infrastructures, other government departments and agencies).

Measure 148 of the Master Plan aims to convert, from 2020-2021, all main heating systems at the end of their useful life that run on fossil fuels to systems using renewable energies.

Vehicle Fleets
The Politique d’acquisition gouvernementale pour les véhicules légers (government policy on the acquisition of light vehicles), in place since Jan 2014, requires new vehicle purchases or existing vehicle replacements to be electric or hybrid electric.

The TEQ Master Plan (p. 159) creates targets to reduce energy consumption in light-duty vehicies by 30% in 2022-23 and 50% in 2029-30, from a 2012-13 base year, and to add 1000 additional electric vehicles by 2022-23.

The TEQ Master Plan calls for improved fleet management practices, and to collect fuel consumption data for all light and heavy vehicles, adoption of home-to-work travel plans, and to limit the travel of public building users.

The 2030 Energy Policy calls for reducing energy consumption (L/100 km) by 50% for light-duty vehicles, from a 2012 base year, and to add 1000 electric or hybrid vehicles to the fleet by 2020. The latter targets is also outlined in the transport electrification action plan (2015-2020).

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

Buildings
The 2017 Climate Change Strategy states that the government will require new and renovated government buildings to exceed the 2015 National Energy Code for Buildings by 10%. The strategy also calls for increasing the number of government buildings with a sustainability certification. By 2016-2017 47 government buildings received BOMA BEST certification.

Vehicle Fleets
The 2017 Climate Change Strategy calls for using idle time limiters on government trucks, and commits to greater efficiency and lower emissions in government transportation fleets.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Buildings
The 2009 Energy Strategy calls for new construction funded by the government to meet energy efficiency standards.

The 2020 clean future indicates that the Government of Yukon will lead by example in this area by undertaking energy efficiency retrofits and installing renewable heating systems to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Government of Yukon buildings by 30% by 2030, compared to 2010. The target is to complete 2,000 residential, commercial and institutional energy efficiency retrofits by 2030.

Vehicle Fleets
In 2016, the Yukon government added an electric vehicle to its fleet as a pilot project to test the vehicles range and recharge times at winter temperatures.

The 2009 Energy Strategy calls for targets for vehicle use and fuel consumption in the government’s vehicle fleet.  

The 2020 “our clean future” targets to have at least 4,800 zero emission vehicles registered in the territory – or approximately one in every eight passenger vehicles on the road .

Last reviewed: November 2021

Grid Modernization

Grid modernization refers to new technologies and practices to enhance the resiliency of energy grids, such as advanced metering infrastructure and innovative rate designs.

Alberta

Advanced metering

Installation of AMI in Alberta is ultimately the decision of the distribution utilities. A recent report by the AUC into the distribution system notes AMI infrastructure coverage varies from utility. The report notes that EPCOR is one of the few utilities with interval-capable meters installed across its service territories. ATCO Electric has one-way meters installed in its territory and plans to install 2,000 AMI meters in the Grande Prairie region.

ENMAX is replacing existing meters only after end-of-life and approximately 16% of its meters are now AMI. Fortis residential and small commercial meters are not capable of interval readings and plans to replace all cumulative meters over the next 10 years. EQUS was aiming for full AMI coverage by early 2021, and the City of Medicine Hat has replaced all electricity and natural gas meters with AMI meters.

Non-wires/Non-pipe alternatives

The Alberta Utilities Commission (AUC) currently does not pursue non-wires/pipes alternatives beyond what would be justified by performance-based regulations. A recently released study by the AUC into the distribution system identified a number of barriers to non-wires alternatives and distributed energy resources (particularly energy storage).

Conservation voltage reduction
The City of Lethbridge is piloting Conservation Voltage Reduction with the support of Alberta Innovates. For more information, see https://albertainnovates.ca/impact/newsroom/powering-up-electrical-grid-research-new-industry-consortium-pilots-smart-grid-tech-in-lethbridge/

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

Advanced metering
The 2010 BC Clean Energy Act (section 17) called for a program to installed advanced meters by the end of 2012. BC Hydro launched a program in July 2011.  A 2013 Direction to the British Columbia Utilities Commission set standards and conditions under which electricity consumers in the province can continue to use a legacy meter or choose to use a “radio-off” smart meter, rather than the standard smart meter model.

Both BC Hydro and FortisBC reported widespread coverage (>99%) of two-way metering infrastructure in both residential and non-residential rate classes. FortisBC Energy Inc., (natural gas) does not have advanced metering in place for any but its largest commercial / industrial customers, though an application to install AMI for all customers was made to the BCUC in May 2021.

Non-wires alternatives
BC Hydro's pilot work on selected substations is informing the development of a Non-Wires Alternative (NWA) framework, which is expected to provide potential alternatives to traditional capital-build solutions in substations to meet local / regional needs.

In 2020, BC Hydro’s activities reflected a continuation of pilots and trials initiated in previous years. The pilots and trials have focused on managing peak loads on the system.

All the technologies and processes BC Hydro is testing are proven, commercially available products, but their application is new and innovative to BC Hydro’s system. The aim of the work is to inform program design (e.g., demand response trials, localised DSM pilots, connected home product trials, and distributed energy resource management systems).

FortisBC is exploring partnering with the City of Kelowna, NRCan and other partners to geo-spatially model building energy intensities, which could support geo-targeting of neighborhoods for community retrofit plans. The utility also recently completed a demand-response pilot targeting large consumers and identified opportunities for a manually dispatched demand response program. In 2021, FortisBC launched a residential demand response program that will be completed in 2022.

Conservation voltage reduction
BC Hydro currently runs VVO in energy conservation mode on 50 stations, optimizing voltages for almost half of distribution feeders and covering some of the largest distribution substations. In 2020, BC Hydro estimated it achieved approximately 189 GWh of energy savings through these activities, which are not considered in the utility's DSM plan.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

Advanced metering

In January 2007, Manitoba Hydro launched a pilot project for the installation of advanced electricity and natural gas meters. The project concluded in 2009, with the final report stating the need for study of anticipated benefits and project risks. An analysis was performed on various roll out scenarios in 2019 but no investment decision has yet been made. Few customers, electric or natural gas, residential or non-residential, have two-way meters installed.

Non-wires alternatives / Geo-targeting

Distribution and transmission planning processes allow for but do not require non-wires/pipes solutions to be included in the evaluation of options to meet local/regional investment in infrastructure.

Manitoba Hydro has started initial work on developing a location specific DSM marginal value to be used to identify system constraints that could benefit from geo-targeting.

Some 'smart wire' solutions have been recommended on the transmission system, and the utility is exploring energy storage potential in the transmission system as well, but there appears to be no geo-targeting of energy efficiency or demand response.

Conservation voltage reduction
Manitoba Hydro does not use conservation voltage reduction

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

Advanced metering
In 2017 NB Power applied to the NB Energy and Utilities Board seeking approval to implement Advanced Metering Infrastructure; the board denied its request. NB Power reapplied in 2019 with a revised business case. The regulator approved this second application in September 2020. The project is underway with meter upgrades expected to begin in March 2022 and the project completing in 2024.

Non-wires alternatives / Geo-targetting

NB Power conducted engineering analysis at four locations to evaluate the potential of non-wire solutions to reduce the cost to serve sparse customer populations in remote areas of the province. The study involved residential load profile analysis, localized feeder current monitoring and obtaining equipment cost estimates. None of the areas were financially viable and the project was closed, with plans to re-evaluate one of the locations in the future.

Conservation voltage reduction
NB Power is testing conservation voltage reduction as part of a Grid Modernization Research and Development Pilot Project, with Siemens, Natural Resources Canada, and the National Research Council. Approximately 5,000 NB Power homes and businesses in specific areas of the province were part of this one-year pilot project. Broader CVR implementation is planned to start in 2022/2023.

Other
New Brunswick Power’s ten-year plan (2019-2028) includes “Energy Smart NB” (formerly known as “Reduce and Shift Demand”) is a long-term plan to modernize the decades old grid and shift in-province electricity demand to defer the next significant generation investment. It includes “smart grid” (technology and software), “smart habits” (energy efficiency and demand response), “smart solutions” (new products and services that engage consumers and leverage demand side management and smart grid technology) elements.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

Advanced metering
Utilities in the province have installed one-way meters for many residential and non-residential customers, though two-way meter coverage remains lower, with 20% of Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro's residential customers, and 1% of non-residential customers, having them installed.

Non-wires alternatives / Geo-targetting
No actitivities identified.

Conservation voltage reduction
Newfoundland Power uses conservation voltage reduction to manage peak load in the winter. Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro does have CVR capability, but has not used it for energy conservations purposes to date and there are no immediate plans to do so.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

Advanced metering
Regulatory actions related to Nova Scotia’s AMI initiative began in 2015, with the installation of meters starting in 2019. Nova Scotia Power’s $133 million AMI initiative is currently underway, with plans to have all meters be smart meters by 2021.

Non-wires alternatives / Geo-targetting
In 2016 the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (NSUARB ) ordered EfficiencyOne and NS Power to begin investigating non-wires alternatives and locational DSM (geotargeting) techniques. Three reports on the topic have been provided under board proceeding number M07815, and provide conceptual design information and proposed preliminary techniques for economic comparison.

 In 2020 NS Power produced updated avoided costs of transmission and distribution reports, which are available publicly at the NSUARB. These avoided costs provide an enabling key piece of information for the development of further locational DSM activity in Nova Scotia.

Work continued on the locational DSM (“Klondike”) pilot in 2020, for customers in the Kentville area. Enhanced incentives were provided through five existing Efficiency Nova Scotia programs. Outcomes were negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the pilot has now closed. Evaluation is scheduled to take place in 2021.

Conservation voltage reduction
Conservation voltage reduction is not used in Nova Scotia.

Other
Active demand response is currently in the investigation stage in NS - 2019 DSM Potential Study will include active demand response. NS Power is currently testing both distribution-scale and behind-the-meter battery storage as part of the Intelligent Feeder Project, as well as certain other smart grid technologies. NS Power historically participated in the Power Shift Atlantic project, which investigated demand response techniques.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

Advanced metering
The 2013 Energy Action Plan calls for the installation of smart meters in four communities over three years.

Rate design
Electricity rates vary between different communities. The majority of residential electricity rates have an inclining block rate, with higher prices for higher levels of electricity usage. Businesses have a uniform electric energy charge.

Last reviewed: November 2o21

Nunavut

Advanced metering
The Qulliq Energy Corporation (QEC) launched the Iqaluit Smart Grid program in 2016. The program installed over 4,000 smart meters and QEC also installed a specialized smart meter transformer, a server to store smart meter data, and software, which allows for the transmission of smart meter data between the smart meter database and QEC’s billing system. Over the next 5 years, the performance of the Iqaluit Smart Grid program will be monitored to determine if its targets (1-2% demand reduction and 1% energy savings) are met. This program received $1,350,000 in funding from Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative.

QEC identifies the Iqaluit Smart Grid project as something to replicated in other Nunavut communities in the future.

Non-wires alternatives
Nunavut energy system is comprised of a series of isolated grids. As such the Qulliq Energy Corporation has no regional electricity transmission capacity or transmission assets.

Rate design
The Qulliq Energy Corporation has a “community based rate design” with rates differing across Nunavut’s 25 communities to reflect costs in different territories. These area-based rates to do not necessarily reflect local costs.

The Nunavut Electricity Subsidy Program (NESP) subsidizes electricity consumption for small commercial and residential customers. The subsidies are removed after a threshold level of electricity consumption.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

Advanced metering
The government announced a Smart Metering Initiative in April 2004 with a target of complete coverage for all residential and small business ratepayers by 2010. Ontario has since completed a full deployment of one-way smart meters for residential and small business electricity customers with demand under 50kW. Interval meters have been mandated for electricity customers with demand over 50kW since August 21, 2020.

On December 14, 2017 the government passed legislative amendments to the Green Energy Act, 2009 and Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998 to enable Ontario to establish a regulatory framework to require electricity and natural gas utilities to implement Green Button and prescribe certification requirements by a deadline through regulation as well as reporting requirements. In addition the amendments gave the Ontario Energy Board authority to enforce Green Button requirements for electricity and natural gas utilities and grant implementation extensions for utilities based on criteria to be set out in regulation. The provisions in the Green Energy Act, 2009 were repealed and re-enacted in the Electricity Act, 1998 through the Green Energy Repeal Act, 2019 on January 1, 2019.

On October 28 2019, “Better for People, Smarter for Business” was released, which included an update that Ontario is exploring potential costs of expanding Green Button – Connect My Data to allow Ontarians to monitor their energy usage and make better choices about it.

Natural Gas

Enbridge has piloted the use of one-way meters (AMR) and may be in a position to advance an AMI-specific application and a viable roll-out strategy to the OEB as soon as 2022/2023.

Non-wires alternatives
Both non-wires and wires options may be evaluated as part of the IESO's Regional Planning Process to meet regional electricity system needs. The IESO, transmitters, distributors, and other stakeholders participate in different stages of this process. Non-wires options are studied specifically during the Integrated Regional Resource Plan (IRRP) stage.

The IESO led an initiative to review and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Regional Planning Process. Findings and recommendations were published in the Regional Planning Process Review Final Report in Feb 2021. Since then, the IESO has begun work on incremental improvements to how non-wire alternatives are studied in Integrated Regional Resource Plans and will communicate updates to stakeholders towards the end of 2021.

A first-generation IRP framework recently issued by the OEB requires consideration of non-pipe alternatives, but only in growth-driven projects or large replacement projects. The framework allows for Enbridge to seek opportunities with the IESO or local electricity distributors to facilitate electricity-based alternatives to address system needs or constraints, but explicitly excludes funding and delivery of electricity-based alternatives from natural gas ratepayers.

Pilot Projects

Updates include the OEB approving an additional $4.6 million in spending over the 2020-2024 period for a battery storage project that would defer distribution infrastructure as part of Toronto Hydro’s Station Expansions Program. The IESO ran the local capacity auction for the York Region Non-Wires Alternatives demonstration in 2020 which procured 10 MW of local demand response and generation capacity for availability in summer 2021.

The IESO, working with Alectra (with funding from Natural Resources Canada), ran a first-of-kind in Canada (and likely North America) local capacity auction in 2020 to evaluate the potential to procure peak capacity from local assets as a cost-effective means of deferring or off-setting new transmission and distribution infrastructure. Auction participation and clearing prices suggest that local resources can be used to cost-effectively defer traditional infrastructure.

Enbridge completed its Ingleside geo-targeted demand-side management project, and proposed two more pilot projects as part of its IRP process.

Conservation voltage reduction
In 2014, Hydro Ottawa was supported by the IESO Conservation Fund to run a demonstration project to see if Conservation Voltage Regulation could produce quantifiable electricity savings for customers.

Entegrus is implemeting a voltage regulation system, enabling conservation voltage reduction in the town of Thamesville. Grid Edge Control Devices from Varentec Inc. will be installed to establish an integrated smart grid solution, facilitating high-level grid control and visualization, as well as energy conservation through voltage reduction.

Additional LDCs have implemented VVO/CVR initiatives with funding from the Ministry of Energy Smart Grid Fund, including Entegrus, Hydro One, London Hydro, and EnWin.

The IESO conducts routine voltage reduction tests for system optimization and reliability purposes, and published a study in 2019 that identifies protocols for evaluating energy savings and reductions as a result of voltage reduction. During a July 2019 test, the IESO found that a three percent voltage reduction resulted in an average reduction in provincial demand of 1.3%, and a 5% voltage reduction resulted in an average demand reduction of 1.94%.

Other
The Energy Transformation Network of Ontario was originally created as the “Smart Grid Forum” in 2009. The network comprises utility sector, industry associations, public agencies, and universities working together to develop the Smart Grid in Ontario.

The Grid Innovation Fund (formerly the Technology Development Fund and Conservation Fund) has existed since 2005 to support projects that enable customers to better manage their energy consumption or reduce the costs associated with maintaining reliable operation in the province’s grid.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

Advanced metering
There have been smart meter pilot programs in Prince Edward Island, though widespread coverage does not yet appear to be in place. Summerside Electric is currently installing AMI meters, with 400 installed to date, which supports ETS heating to match wind generation. Maritime Electric aims to have smart metering rolled out across the island by 2025.

Non-wires alternatives
The 2016-2017 Energy Strategy notes that geotargeted energy efficiency can avoid the need to build transmission and distribution capacity. The plan calls for developing a set of guidelines for when geotargeted energy efficiency should be considered and developing geotargeted energy efficiency protocols.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Quebec

Advanced metering
Hydro-Québec reported that over 4 million communicating meters had been installed in the province, or 99.4% of all meters requiring replacement, an increase from 3.9 million in 2019. AMI devices provide real time usage updates to customers and allow for dynamic pricing to be in place. Hilo Energie is a new subsidiary of Hydro-Québec that focuses on getting smart home energy devices into its customers’ hands so they can understand their energy usage and reduce it as needed.

Non-wire planning processes
Hydro-Québec currently has a planning process that includes NWA, but is working on updating it to integrate the most promising alternative solutions for the future.

Conservation voltage reduction
Hydro-Quebec conducted the ‘CATVAR’ (1, 2) project between 2007 and 2016 to install and demonstrate equipment to manage distribution grid voltage and reactive power. The project was cancelled in 2016 due to planned energy surpluses and less than expected energy savings (though the deployed equipment will be maintained on the network until end-of-life, and thus will continue to deliver some energy savings).

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

Advanced metering
SaskPower is currently installing AMI meters at commercial and industrial customer sites and has started AMI pilots for residential customers. To date, AMI coverage is approximately 77% for non-residential customers, and 1% for residential customers.

SaskEnergy installed an additional 8,700 advanced natural gas meters in 2020, reaching nearly 100% of its residential and non-residential customers with two-way meters.

Non-wires alternatives
SaskEnergy reported that it has shifted its strategy to target end-use energy efficiency prior to infrastructure investments in capacity expansions. SaskPower reported that its planning process for its transmission system considers the most cost-effective wires or non-wires solutions.

Conservation voltage reduction
SaskPower is planning a volt-var optimization pilot in 2021-2022. This pilot will leverage volt-var information acquired through AMI meters and smart substation metering and reclosers used to establish a dynamic volt-var baseline. This baseline will be used to implement measures to compensate for volt-var to reduce system losses.

Other
SaskPower has four other major initiatives underway, including the development of an outage management system, a distribution SCADA system, substation automation, and creating a new distribution control centre.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Advanced metering
No advanced meter roll-out in the territory. In 2010, the Yukon Electrical Company proposal to install advanced meters was rejected by the utility board.

Non-wires alternatives
No information available.

Conservation voltage reduction
No information available.

Rate design
Rates vary by service area. Inclining block rates with higher energy charges above a consumption threshold are prominent for residential and general service customers classes.

Yukon Energy industrial customers can receive a peak shaving credit.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Carbon Pricing

Carbon pricing can help reduce market barriers to energy efficiency by increasing the cost of fossil fuel-based energy and related products, and when associated revenues are directed toward energy efficiency programs and projects.

Alberta

Proceeds from Alberta's industrial pricing system go into the Technology Innovation and Emissions Reduction (TIER) fund. The regulation detailing TIER does not specify exactly how this fund is to be used, but the province has committed to using it to support emissions-reduction programs for industry. In its information request response to Efficiency Canada, the province indicated that TIER funding supports some energy efficiency programs remaining after the closure of Energy Efficiency Alberta.

Last reviewed: November 2021

British Columbia

BC launched the CleanBC Program for Industry in 2019, funded by the incremental carbon tax above $30 per tonne as paid by industry. There are two components: a CleanBC Industry Fund, which invests a portion of revenues into businesses working on emission reduction projects; and the CleanBC Industrial Incentive Program (CIIP), which reduces carbon tax costs for operators that can demonstrate world-leading emissions performance. Energy efficiency improvements are eligible under the Industry Fund, though the province did not report the amount of funding for energy efficiency improvements in 2020.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Manitoba

The federal carbon price backstop and industrial output-based pricing systems are currently in place in Manitoba.  The province therefore does not have direct control over the use of carbon pricing revenues.

Last reviewed: November 2021

New Brunswick

Carbon pricing revenues began being collected on April 1, 2020. Approximately 55% of proceeds go to reducing the burden on the natural gas utility and compensating for a reduction in the fuel/diesel excise tax. The remaining portion goes to a Climate Fund, administered by the province. The province reported $25.9 million in revenues for 2020, of which approximately 45% went to supporting various energy efficiency-related programs and initiatives.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Newfoundland and Labrador

Proceeds are used to offset reduced provincial fuel excise taxes. The province has committed to matching federal support from the Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund for energy efficiency, fuel switching, and industrial process improvements (in the amount of $44.7 million), though it is unclear how carbon pricing revenues are earmarked for such purposes. The province did not report the amount of funding from carbon pricing revenues for energy efficiency improvements in 2020.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia hosted its first cap-and-trade auctions in June and December 2020. Proceeds are deposited into a green fund, which is legislated to be used to reduce GHG emissions, mitigate social and economic impacts, or adapt to the impacts of climate change. In our information request, the government reported that approximately 88% of the $28.7 million raised in 2020 would be used to support renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements. This includes $11.45 million over five years to expand the existing Affordable Multi-family Housing program, $3.5 million over three years for the Small Business and Not-for-profit Energy Solutions program, and $4.75 million for the HomeWarming program. SolarHomes also received funding

Last reviewed: November 2021

Northwest Territories

Carbon Pricing will be in place in July 2019. A carbon price will start at $20/tonne and increase annually to reach $50/tonne in 2022. Avaiation fuel is exempt and costs related to home heating will be fully rebated.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Nunavut

An output-based pricing system will be in place for emissions-intensive trade-exposed industries, and a charge on fuel producers and distributors will apply in July 2019. In recognition of unique circumstances special provisions are made for fuels used for aviation within the territory and for diesel-fired electricity generation in remote communities.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Ontario

The federal carbon price backstop and industrial output-based pricing system were in place in 2020 and therefore the province did not have control over the use of carbon pricing revenues. 

Last reviewed: November 2021

Prince Edward Island

Proceeds go into general government revenue and are used to offset reduced provincial fuel excise taxes, to reduce costs for drivers and public transit users, and to support electric vehicle incentives.

Last reviewed:  November 2021

Quebec

Until 2020, the provincial government transferred all proceeds from its cap-and-trade system to the Fonds Vert ('Green Fund') to implement its climate change action plan and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Improving energy efficiency, particularly in transportation and buildings, was a core priority, and proceeds supported programs in both areas. Concerns were raised about mismanagement and underperformance of this fund, and in November 2020, the provincial government replaced the Fonds Vert with a new Electrification and Climate Change Fund, under the direct management of the Ministry of Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change. The province did not report the amount of funding for energy efficiency improvements in 2020

Last reviewed: November 2021

Saskatchewan

Proceeds from Saskatchewan's provincially-administered industrial pricing system go to the Saskatchewan Technology Fund, which can be used by the government to support emissions-reduction projects in regulated facilities. The criteria for determining eligible projects has yet to be published, but will be released before the first due date for compliance payments. The province did report that it would invest a minimum of $18 million in energy efficiency projects in schools, though a portion of this funding may come from the federal government's Climate Action Incentive Fund.

Last reviewed: November 2021

Yukon

Yukon has voluntary opted into the federal government carbon pricing system. An output-based pricing system will be implemented for large industry in July 2019 (alongside the other territories). A charge on fuel producers and distributors will start applying in July 2019. Aviation fuels will be exempt, and relief is provided for diesel-fired electricity generation for remote communities.

Last reviewed: November 2021

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